Stories

Stories

Check out the awards photos from the 2018 Bands of America Tennessee Regional Championship

High resolution awards photos (as well as additional action photos of each band) can be viewed and purchased on the Jolesch Enterprises website: http://www.bandgroupphotography.com/BOA/Index.html

by Doug Hassell, Director of Bands, Carroll H.S., IN

Seeing our kids perform as part of the Bands of America Bowling Green Regional yesterday was so cool for multiple reasons. First and probably the most obvious, I love this band program at Carroll. These kids, the parents, the staff, bus drivers…everyone that it takes to teach and move the small army of people that is the Charger Pride for any event, I applaud ALL of you. Quite literally, each one of you plays an integral part in allowing these kids to be rock stars for eight minutes on a football field. At Carroll, we talk a lot about how disproportionate the amount of time spent in preparation is to the time actually in performance…it’s practically insane how much time we spend together…not performing. So, we believe that THAT TIME has to be valuable and meaningful for all involved...just as much as the performance time (if not more-so).

Yesterday was a minute-by-minute reminder of that.

Being fortunate enough to have our kids perform again in finals amped that whole experience up, but here’s the really cool part – I got to see not only our band family, but several others doing the same thing. At BGSU, literally EVERYWHERE you looked you could see moms fixing uniform problems; dads setting up and tearing down props; staff members and directors listening to Judge commentary; Judges smiling, listening, watching, giving feedback on current achievement as well as information for future growth…and the kids – so many band kids, smiling…laughing…focusing…singing…playing…marching…dancing…crying…eating…interacting…growing.

It got me thinking: If standardized tests were administered like marching bands competitions, the people who grade them – and often those who write them, the test company people – would be standing in front of the students, looking into their eyes, seeing them sweat, smelling the odor of their efforts, watching them breathe…while they are taking their “test.” If standardized tests were administered like marching band competitions, the test company people would assess the students in exact same audience as the parents who put them there, would stand on the same “performance field” with those who taught the students, and would provide live real-time feedback to both the students and the teachers, in the context of the performance environment in meaningful context with direct application to why what the student is doing is good or not.

As I have listened to some judge commentary, one thing that is clear: those who do the adjudicating are more than likely all of our biggest fans. They’re rooting for us, they’re desiring to be entertained and engaged by our students and the shows they perform because they know how valuable what we do is. They also know how hard what we do is, and they recognize that. I love that people who TRULY UNDERSTAND what we as educators are trying to do in spite of the obstacles placed before us by education lawmakers are rooting for us and they are helping us get better.

We are constantly seeing on both public news and social media how we need to have people who can be accountable, authentic, creative, independent, and also work as part of a team where they understand that their actions at any point can have long-lasting effects on others around them. Last night, I was fortunate enough to be a small part of seeing thousands upon thousands of teenagers pour their hearts into something that will only be a small part of their high school career, but in all likelihood, will be how many of them define and remember their high school career…and probably have an impact on the kind of person they grow up to be.

MANY KUDOS to all involved in running, participating in, watching, and performing in not just the one event we were at, but to ALL of them throughout the country. THIS Is where some of the best learning and growing in the country is happening…on the field.

doug hassellDoug Hassell is in his 20th year in public education in the state of Indiana and is in his 7th year at Carroll High School in his hometown of Fort Wayne IN, where he also received his Bachelor’s Degree in Music Education from Indiana-Purdue University @ Fort Wayne (Now Purdue Fort Wayne).

Editor's note: Thank you to Mr. Hassell for his permission to share this post.

Check out the awards photos from the 2018 Bands of America Northwest Ohio Regional Championship

High resolution awards photos (as well as additional action photos of each band) can be viewed and purchased on the Jolesch Enterprises website: http://www.bandgroupphotography.com/BOA/Index.html

Check out the awards photos from the 2018 Bands of America Austin Regional Championship

High resolution awards photos (as well as additional action photos of each band) can be viewed and purchased on the Jolesch Enterprises website: http://www.bandgroupphotography.com/BOA/Index.html

Check out the awards photos from the 2018 Bands of America West Texas Regional Championship

High resolution awards photos (as well as additional action photos of each band) can be viewed and purchased on the Jolesch Enterprises website: http://www.bandgroupphotography.com/BOA/Index.html

Check out the awards photos from the 2018 Bands of America South Texas Regional Championship

High resolution awards photos (as well as additional action photos of each band) can be viewed and purchased on the Jolesch Enterprises website: http://www.bandgroupphotography.com/BOA/Index.html

Check out the awards photos from the 2018 Bands of America Oxford Regional Championship

High resolution awards photos (as well as additional action photos of each band) can be viewed and purchased on the Jolesch Enterprises website: http://www.bandgroupphotography.com/BOA/Index.html

Wednesday, September 05, 2018

5 New Things You’ll Love in Indy This Fall

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Whether you venture to Indy for Super Regionals or Grand Nationals, here are five new things in store for you and your families in the Circle City.

Riley Children’s Health Sports Legends Experience at The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis
A brand new 7.5 acre expansion of the world’s largest children’s museum takes advantage of Indy’s rich sports heritage. Partnerships with the NBA Pacers, NFL Colts, Indianapolis Motor Speedway, and Pete and Alice Dye create 12 interactive experiences for kids and adults of all ages and abilities.

Long-Tailed Macaques at The Indianapolis Zoo
Watch these swimming monkeys confidently dive, jump, and splash in their water habitat, at the zoo’s latest permanent exhibit.

The Reel West at the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art
All fans of Westerns will enjoy a look at Hollywood’s costumes, props, paintings, movie posters, and imagery from early silent Westerns through today.

Indianapolis Colts – The Exhibit at the Indiana Historical Society
Take a look back at how this NFL team has captured the hearts and loyalty of Central Indiana fans since 1984. The exhibit explores football’s role in American culture through hands-on activities, player interviews, and original artifacts.

Craft Breweries are Now Kid Friendly
The city’s most established craft brewery now welcomes the under 21 crowd for food and fun. Sun King Brewery partnered with Goose the Market to open Oca restaurant in their downtown tasting room. St. Joseph’s, Triton, Scotty’s, Books and Brews, Broad Ripple Brewpub, and Brugge are also notable kid-friendly spots.

BSU Editorial photo

If your students love music, encourage them to discover the world-class education available at Ball State University.

Recognized for its national leadership and innovative programming at both the graduate and undergraduate levels, Ball State’s School of Music prepares students for a wide range of careers. Students are challenged academically as well as musically, mentored by faculty while they develop their skills, deepen their artistry, and experience all the School of Music has to offer.

Students also can perform with award-winning ensembles, develop recording engineering and songwriting skills, compose music for a variety of performers and media, or prepare to teach in today's music classrooms.

More than a dozen performance groups are open to Ball State students, including the 65-member Ball State Symphony Orchestra, the “Pride of Mid-America” Marching Band, and Ball State Basketball Band. Students can audition for a spot with the Ball State University Singers, or join the Statesmen or Women’s Chorus, open to any singer, no audition required.

The School of Music offers five majors and eight minors for undergraduates; two master’s degrees; a doctor of arts; an artist diploma; and an undergraduate certificate, graduate certificate, and doctoral secondary area of study in entrepreneurial music.

Take a virtual tour of the campus at youvisit.com/tour/bsu. Learn more by visiting bsu.edu/music or calling 765-285-5400.

Director of Bands at O’Fallon Township High School 

Dr. Gustafson-Hinds grew up in the small town of Monmouth, IL. The band program was fairly small, but Melissa says the director’s love for music and kids inspired her to pursue a career involving music. In addition to playing oboe at Monmouth, Dr. G (as her students call her), was also a baton twirler and dancer.

Melissa was unsure about her path as a teacher. Her mother was a teacher, so she figured that maybe this is a family gene that was passed down to her. What she does know is that growing up, she always felt her band program lacked resources, but she never knew exactly what those resources were. Although her band directors were amazing, she knew that the lack of resources prevented them from doing more in the band world. Dr. Gustafson-Hinds says that because of this, “My number one thing that I do as a teacher right now is to make sure I'm providing all the students a multitude of experiences within my power and resources that we have.”

Once her time in Monmouth concluded, Dr. G attended Illinois State University as an oboe player and conductor for the marching band, where she was first introduced to teaching. After a while, she decided that it was time to go and put her own stamp on things. At that point, she moved to Southern Illinois and ended up at O’Fallon Township High School, where she has now served 10 years out of her 24 years of teaching.

“I think my passion, at least for music education is providing just amazing experiences for kids”, Melissa says. Not only is Dr. Gustafson-Hinds the Director of Bands at O’Fallon, but she also serves as Department Chair, where she is involved with the choirs as well.

As she oversees O’Fallon’s marching band, wind ensemble, symphonic winds, symphonic band, and Milburn band, Dr. G oftentimes takes a step away from the music. She believes that it is important for her students to “learn to be people”. They need to be able to show up on time, always be prepared, work together with others, be positive, and be respectful to everyone. Many of these lessons are naturally portrayed to her students in the way she conducts rehearsals. As her former student at O’Fallon, I know that these are her standard expectations aside from showing up and playing your instrument.

“I think through band, there's so many things that they can learn despite being just great people. And besides giving them amazing experiences, I'm hoping that as they go through the program at O'Fallon Township High School, they end up being really amazing people, and that they can venture and then do their own thing.”

One of Melissa’s largest takeaways as a teacher is networking. She finds it very important to find someone that can be your go-to person. Nobody knows all of the answers, but there is always someone more experienced that may be willing to help. This is one reason why she loves the Midwest Clinic and Music for All. She says,“If you're at those marching band events, there's everybody around, or a concert band event or anything like that, it's a really great place to meet really fabulous educators that understand who you are”. Dr. G understands that, “because we're kind of on little islands, in a way, some people understand what you do, but not completely, because they're not living it.”

Dr. G believes that the best teachers are always learning. She tries to remain available to others because she knows that others have always been available to her.

Both Melissa and her students take the marching season very seriously. To them, Grand Nationals is not only an opportunity to perform, but it is an opportunity to learn. She considers herself blessed that she has a team that supports her ideas and visions. She believes in Music for All and our vision, and that has helped get her students to where they are now.

Dr. Melissa Gustafson-Hinds is all around an amazing woman, mentor, mother, and friend. She does a phenomenal job teaching her students to not only be fantastic musicians, but to be truly amazing people. I am thankful to have had the opportunity to study under her in my high school years. Without her guidance, I would not have the opportunity to share her story as a Music for All Marketing Intern.

Thank you Dr. G for being an extraordinary music educator!

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