Erin Fortune
Erin Fortune
Erin Fortune is the Director of Sponsorships at Music for All and has been working with Music for All since 2010, first in the Participant Relations department, followed by the marketing department as Marketing Manager, and is now in advancement. She is a graduate of the Music Industry Management program at Ferris State University in Michigan and is a former Percussive Arts Society Intern and a Yamaha Corporation of America, Band and Orchestral Division Intern.
Wednesday, October 14, 2020

MFA's IMPACT: Ric and Jeannette Coons

Our new Music for All Impact series will introduce you to some of the incredible advocates of Music for All as they share their stories of Music for All’s impact on them and why there were compelled to pay it forward to ensure that others feel that impact as well. In today’s spotlight, we are thrilled to introduce you to Ric and Jeannette Coons.

 Ric Coons Photo 3Ric and Jeannette distributing "Team Texas" shirts before CTJ's 2019 Grand Nationals trip.

How did you become involved with Music for All?

My first introduction to Music for All (MFA) was in 2011. Our oldest daughter was a freshman guard member in the Claudia Taylor Johnson H.S. band program. The program competed in Houston and made their first trip to Grand Nationals in Indy and my wife and I followed the band there to watch them compete and make finals. That was when I realized that this was far different than the marching bands I grew up with in the 80’s in California.

What attracted you to the cause?

Music was a very important part of growing up for me. It was what kept me engaged in school from 4th grade through high school and taught me life lessons that I have used in my adult life and career for the past 35 years. The more I learned about MFA outside of just the marching arts with the Summer Symposium and National Festival as well as the music advocacy programs that work to ensure that every child has access and opportunity to have music education as part of their scholastic environment, I felt the need to support it.

What is your favorite Music for All memory?

While there are many, the 2019 Grand National Championships were special to my wife and me. We attended in 2011 with our freshman daughter competing. We returned in 2019 with our freshman son competing and our adult daughter getting to experience the event as a spectator cheering for her brother. Announcing our program as the Esprit de Corps award winner – it just reminds us of the lessons that our kids are learning as part of their programs and the life value it brings to our kids and families.

What impact has music education had on your life?

Friendships that we have made in our programs, as well as in programs from across the country, have been amazing. The process of learning to be a part of something bigger than yourself has been impactful, as well as learning the passion and dedication required to reach a purpose or goal.

What does Music for All's mission mean to you?

The statement of providing “positively life-changing experiences for students” means a great deal to my wife and me. I experienced this growing up and I have seen it with my children and so many children that have had the access to music education in middle school and high school.

Ric Coons Photo 1Ric, Jeannette, and their son at the Urban Farm for the San Antonio Food Bank with the Claudia Taylor Johnson Band 

What compelled you to be a donor?

We have seen music programs and fine arts across the country lose funding over the years. My wife and I have seen the value of music education and we are fortunate enough to have a phenomenal group of music educators that support our kids. We have been fortunate enough to be in a position to support our middle and high school programs here locally. But we also feel the need to support the mission of MFA outside our local community and are proud to do so.

In your opinion, what is the most important work that Music for All does?

Music advocacy – your ability to bring so many national sponsors together and provide outstanding opportunities for our kids to perform in such a positive way that will touch their lives forever. They carry that with them and it leads them to want to give back so that others that do not have access can be supported.

What do you wish people knew about Music for All?

There is no other organization in the country that provides the ability to bring young people together for the sole purpose of promoting the musical arts in a positive manner and in world-class venues and that promotes access to music education within our youth communities - from BOA events to the honor brands that allow individuals from across the country to grow together. MFA uses its platform to support areas that do not have access to music education.

Do you have an anecdote/story about Music for All or a Music for All event that really moved you?

Grand Nationals 2019 – I arranged a gathering with parents/alumni from 8 different bands that we have gotten to know from across Texas – and Avon, our honorary Texas band after their 2017 appearance. While we had some great conversations with the MFA team prior to that event, the event was just to watch the live feed of the announcements of the finalists. Eric Martin, MFA’s President and CEO at that time, took time out of what has to be one of his busiest days to speak to the members that were assembled to do a Q&A on the direction of the organization. It was touching that he would take the time to join us.

What would you tell someone who is thinking about donating?

Look at the entire scope of the organization, its mission, and the performance of that mission over the years. If you have a family that has been involved in music education and have seen what it has meant to them, then reach out to support this organization. It is a worthy mission and our kids across the country need the arts.

Ric Coons Photo 2The Coons Family

Monday, September 21, 2020

MFA's IMPACT: Dr. Christopher Protho

Our new Donor Spotlight series will introduce you to some of the incredible advocates of Music for All as they share their stories of Music for All’s impact on them and why there were compelled to pay it forward to ensure that others feel that impact as well. In the second spotlight of our series below, we are thrilled to introduce you to Dr. Christopher Protho.

Chris and Eric EditedPictured left to right: Eric Martin, President & CEO Emeritus of MFA, and Dr. Christopher Protho

How did you become involved with Music for All?

I started when I volunteered in the bus parking lot at the Morgantown, WV Regional (known as the Eastern Regional) in 1990. As a freshman in the WVU band, it was not like I had much of a choice. I had no idea what Bands of America was. I barely understood that marching bands competed against each other. 

The real connection came in 1991, at the end of my freshman year. I was a few minutes late for the Wind Symphony’s commencement rehearsal in May. I was asked to see Dave Satterfield (WVU Asst. Director of Bands and Cadets staff) after rehearsal. Dave was generally responsible for discipline, so I spent the rehearsal preparing myself for a well-deserved tongue-lashing. Instead, he asked me if I could work at a camp in Wisconsin, the 1991 BOA Summer Workshop [now the MFA Summer Symposium] held in Whitewater, WI. BOA needed a clarinet SWAG to fill a last-minute vacancy. Just like that, I was an 18-year-old SWAG who had never been to Wisconsin, never worked with so many students, and (like most of the world) didn’t know what SWAG meant. (Heck, I didn’t know that SWAG was an acronym and I really didn’t know how special it was to be one.) In those days, the whole camp participated as the “Pick ‘n Save Band of America” in a Milwaukee parade. 1400+ kids marching in an enormous band in the rain. The band was so big that, although the picture covers what looks like a mile, the whole band’s not in the picture because the back half of the guard hadn’t turned a corner. An old friend of mine still has my red SWAG shirt. I worked Grand Nationals that year and my thank you note was hand-signed by all FIVE staff members.

 Protho 1991 SWAG

What attracted you to the cause?

The people and the scale of the experience. I met so many great people – students, SWAGs, volunteers, staff, clinicians. It felt then (and feels now) that there’s this giant positive energy created through music - all moving in the same direction. Everyone wants to help; everyone wants to contribute; everyone wants to get their own piece of MFA awesomeness by giving some away to someone else. Everyone was helped to feel and be special – every band on the field, every kid at camp, every fan, every pit dad. It has never been just about the official-looking people – kids in their uniforms or judges and staff in their polo shirts. At an Orlando regional, there was a woman who had pulled up a chair to a pond outside the stadium. I remember sitting next to her, listening to her talk about her life’s journey while she was fishing, yes, fishing outside the stadium. It felt like that in 1990 and every year and every event since.

As for the scale, I am beyond amazed at the replication of this feeling and this experience. It is often said that it would be great if something positive could be bottled. Marching Bands of America, Bands of America, and Music for All have found the magic to do just that. In the last thirty years, I have worked in about 50 or 60 venues, from tiny high school fields to NFL stadiums and complete college campuses. The magic is not just in the mission; it’s in the tens of thousands in the MFA family that replicate the mission everywhere for everyone.


Untitled design 1

What is your favorite Music for All memory?

Most MFA events I attend are part of the fall marching championships, so most of my stories come from that part of the year, but I’ve had great memories at the Summer Symposium, the MFA National Festival, and several events that have evolved into other student opportunities in my years between BOA’s 15th Anniversary and MFA’s 45th Anniversary. NOT FAIR. This would be like picking my favorite child. (Editor’s note: Chris provided ten amazing memories, I chose five of my favorite stories he shared for you all to read here.)

5. Atlanta, GA – While problem-solving at the loading dock of the Georgia Dome, the Western Carolina University marching band walked by. From out of the mass of WCU humanity, I hear, “Hey, Mr. Protho, is that you?” A student from my middle school moved from Pennsylvania to North Carolina, finished high school, had joined “The Pride of the Mountains,” and six or seven years later, we unfathomably found one another in one of the most unlikely places.

4. Charleston, WV – Due to a late scheduling change, the Morgantown, WV Regional was moved to Charleston. Additionally, we needed to do the regional without a volunteer site staff (as the WVU “Pride of West Virginia” stayed in Morgantown for the rescheduled game). It became an “all-hands-on-deck” event. We ran that show with about 15 people, with everyone chipping in wherever they could, including Scott McCormick, BOA President, selling programs until he threw his back out and Eric Martin, BOA’s new Vice President, guiding bands from warm-up to the stadium (across a set of active railroad tracks). 

3. Indianapolis, IN – At the RCA Dome pre-Lucas Oil Stadium renovation, buses and trucks needed clearance from a BOA volunteer (designated “Check Point 1”) before driving around the stadium to unload on the tarmac and at the loading docks. One snowy Grand Nationals, I was working on the tarmac as a form of “traffic cop” to help Check Point 1 know when there was sufficient space for the next band to come around. I got a radio call from Jenny Ridge at Check Point 1: “Chris, there’s a band that has to unload NOW!”  I replied, “What is so urgent?”  Jenny said, “You’ll see.”  A truck came around the stadium with virtually no roof.  It had hit a train trestle that was too low and that had peeled the top of the truck back like a sardine can, allowing it to snow on the band’s equipment.

2. Massillon, OH – During this show I was assisting in keeping trophies and medallions straight during awards ceremonies. One year, Mars High School won Class A and was, therefore, entitled to medallions, including medallions presented on-field during the Finals Awards Ceremony. As the director at Mars Middle School, I was extraordinarily proud of my former students. As I prepared to hand several medallions to a VIP to be presented to Mars’s drum majors, I was asked at the last second to present the medallions myself. My pride for my students went off the chart as I had the honor of looking my past students in the eye as they received the highest honor the band had ever received. (Just writing about this moment has me in tears.) My photo of that moment is one of my greatest treasures.

1. Indianapolis, Indiana - I was serving as Contest Director at Grand Nationals and was taking a break, having a conversation with Eric Martin (MFA’s previous President & CEO). A reporter from a major national newspaper entered the room for a scheduled interview with Eric. As I tried to do the polite thing by gathering my belongings so the two could have the room to themselves, Eric invited me to stay. I listened to Eric go further than share a recitation of what MFA does; he shared the core of the mission, why we do what we do, and how what we do impacts people, schools, communities. It wasn’t an interview; it was a sermon. It was an MFA TedTalk.  After decades of seeing, hearing, and feeling the embodiment of love and care through what was known (at the time) as Music for All, I thought I understood it. After listening to Eric, I instantly knew I had a way to go to really know what was going on and why. It was like climbing a mountain, looking up, and realizing I had thousands of feet left to climb.

What impact has music education had on your life?

I am who I am and how I am through music education. Through mentorships lasting seconds to decades, I have learned my part in the lives of young people, the people that support them, and all the people whose paths cross mine over time.  Learning to play the clarinet has, over the years, become a means to an end.  First, I learned to play, then I learned to lead, to follow, and eventually, through music education, learned what my path was meant to be. Internalizing the process of developing and sharing artistry and creativity with others is something that I no longer need an instrument or a baton to achieve.

What does Music for All's mission mean to you? 

I’d like to address this question rather literally. For grammar fans, the mission has two broad parts: the verbs “create, provide, and expand” and the noun “positively life-changing experiences”. For some time, I focused exclusively on the noun. I gave so much thought to what “positively life-changing experiences” look to our larger music community.  I have come to believe that understanding the noun through J.K. Rowling’s adaptation of Louis Armstrong’s famous quote, “If you have to ask, you’ll never know.” Just picking up an instrument, listening to the radio or your local symphony, coming to an event, or saying “thank you” to a volunteer takes one down the path to a positively life-changing experience. 

The verbs have had a more profound effect on me lately. It speaks to the universality of human connection. Creation, provision, and expansion are all methods to extend the beauty of music into the universe, even that little piece of the universe we get to call ours, whether it’s associated with a mascot, identified with zip code, or measured in light-years. The mission is beautifully interminable. There is no end to expressing and serving the mission; there is no point at which one can say, “OK, I’m done. I’ve achieved the mission. I can sit down now.”

What compelled you to be a donor? 

Donating is a small act of giving back and helping to make the creation, provision, and expansion expressed in the mission statement happen. Since I was a toddler, MBA, BOA, and MFA, have continued to find ways to extend the beauty of music into universes large and small, into genres new and traditional, into communities seeking to maximize the excellence to which they have become accustomed and communities who require assistance and support to take the next step toward excellence.

To the friends and family who haven’t been on my journey, it could be easy to misconstrue our relationship. “Chris, they put you on an airplane and send you to here or there and you get to see the best bands in the country and rub elbows with the most talented music educators.” It can sound like Music for All has given me so much over the years. Through one lens, that may be true. What is far more true, is that while I’ve had experiences at the events I attend, is that those experiences cause one to give that experience to one more person, one more community. If my few meager dollars can make that happen, then all the moments will have been worth it.

In your opinion, what is the most important work that Music for All does? 

Persist. Making MFA’s various events happen on simply the logistical level (that leads to the personal and emotional levels) requires an inordinate amount of time, effort, and resources. Being blessed to have had opportunities to serve in leadership at events from time to time, incrementally learning what happens behind the curtain to allow the magic to happen in front of it is truly mind-altering. Without time, effort, and resources, events simply don’t happen. MFA has been able to put those pieces together for generations, and hopefully for generations more. Your homework should be to go to the MFA website’s staff page to see the names and faces of those people you may never see and may never meet but are indispensable to MFA’s events. Imagine Grand Nationals or the Summer Symposium being planned by this small, dedicated group ranging from interns to executives. That’s where we come in as donors and volunteers.  Whenever and wherever you can add to the pools of time, effort, and resources that allow MFA to persist in order to reach out to just one more child, one more program, one more community.

What do you wish people knew about Music for All?

How few full-time employees actually work for MFA. (See the homework assignment above.) For years, I thought there were hundreds; dozens would be generous. 

Do you have an anecdote/story about Music for All or a Music for All event that really moved you? 

At the 1991 Grand Nationals, the process for presenting medals is different than it is now. Then, volunteers individually presented a medallion to each student. As I was presenting a class champion medallion to a young lady from (what was then) Plymouth Centennial High School, they were announced as the National Champions. She removed her hat so I could get a medallion around her neck. As the announcement was made, she broke out in tears as I presented her medallion. I wanted to cry with her.

What would you tell someone who is thinking about donating?

Think about the next step MFA can take because of your donation. Over the years, MFA has developed different dimensions to meet its mission, expanding its geographic footprint, recognizing more student-musicians in more musical genres, extending its reach into underserved communities, recognizing the impact of supporting the growth of young educators, and more. Your donation helps MFA take that next step and helps you take that step along with MFA.

Join Dr. Protho in making a gift in support of Music for All's impact here.

ChrisPurdue

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

DONOR SPOTLIGHT: Patrick Mainieri

More often than not, when you ask someone what makes Music for All special, they talk about the people, and we couldn’t agree more. “People” is one of Music for All’s core values and we are incredibly fortunate to have many committed supporters of our mission to create, provide, and expand positively life-changing experiences through music for all. We hope that our new Donor Spotlight series will introduce you to some of these incredible advocates of Music for All as they share their stories of Music for All’s impact on them and why there were compelled to pay it forward to ensure that others feel that impact as well.

Maineri DSBlog

How did you become involved with Music for All?
I was a participant as a drum major my senior year of high school. It was the first year in our school’s history that our band performed at BOA events. We performed at the St. Louis Super Regional and Atlanta Super Regional that fall. I got reengaged with MFA during the Fall of 2015 as the assistant band director of a program that participated in fall events. In Summer of 2016 I became a SWAG for Summer Symposium and have enjoyed that role each summer since. In March 2017, I attended my first National Festival with our Wind Ensemble students. After building relationships with many of the amazing MFA staff, I began helping on the Events and Participant Relations teams, now regularly assisting at Fall events, Festival, Tournament of Roses, and Summer Symposium. I also enjoy serving on the Advocacy in Action committee, as I get to have amazing conversations about the trend-setters in the music education profession. There is an incredible amount of creativity among music educators!

What attracted you to the cause?
Hands down, the mission and the people. There is an amazing ‘energy’ around everyone at a MFA event. Every person affiliated with MFA is mission minded and focused on the experience. I have taken much of the "vibe" from a MFA event and used it to guide my work as I create experiences for students and families at the school level.

What is your favorite Music for All memory?
There are too many to describe...but if I had to pick one, I'd say watching nervous campers become confident in their leadership over the week at Summer Symposium is always the best. Many kids “find themselves" at camp...because they get to BE themselves.

What impact has music education had on your life?
Music education has impacted almost every aspect of my life. My mom took me to my first trumpet lesson on February 1, 1996. I still remember the room upstairs in the music store. That lesson teacher inspired me from day 1 to love the process of making music. My junior high and high school band directors taught me the value of supporting and defending music education. I married my high school sweetheart, who I met through band. College revealed the network we have in our country to amplify music education. I learned a lot about the value of music education on our society through my work with my collegiate chapter of Phi Mu Alpha, Sinfonia and NAfME Collegiate. Now, as a school administrator, I find myself using many skills learned in my music classes and coursework - leadership, patience, attention to the smallest details, teamwork, listening, communication with varied stakeholders...the list goes on and on – in my daily work with the full school population and supporting teachers and parents.

What does Music for All's mission mean to you?
The word that I take from the mission is 'experience'. Everything in life is an experience and I want to ensure that my interactions with others, as well as the experience they are having holistically, are enjoyable and positive, for them. My personal gratification comes from observing others enjoy the experience.

What compelled you to be a donor?
My wife and I value donating, both financially and through service, with organizations that are meaningful to us. MFA is at the top of our list. Our donations to MFA became amplified when we saw we could make a difference in a child's experience at summer camp. Our focus started with helping get kids to camp, as we feel Summer Symposium is one of those 'once in a lifetime' experiences that could change the entire trajectory for a student.

In your opinion, what is the most important work that Music for All does?
I feel the most important work that MFA does is when it is centered on the student experience. Without students, we don't have music classes. Without music classes, we don't have music directors. And, without those students, MFA would no longer be needed in the capacity it serves. MFA does a lot of things REALLY well, but when the students and their experiences are front and center, I see MFA staff and programming reach new heights.

What do you wish people knew about Music for All?
I wish people FULLY understood that MFA is working, relentlessly, to better diversify its programming by adding more opportunities for all types of music education while working to reach those communities that have a higher need for advocacy and support.

Do you have an anecdote/story about Music for All or a Music for All event that really moved you?
After working on Event staff at the Bowling Green, OH Regional in Fall 2018, a few of us headed to Waffle House to get a late night snack. There was a teenage boy in a band shirt sitting at the table next to us and we began a conversation with him and his parents about the regional. The kid, Max, was a sophomore and that regional was his first MFA event – he loved every second of it. I told them about Summer Symposium and percussion track. Fast forward to summer…While working registration at the percussion track table, Max's mom says, "You may not remember us, but we met you at Waffle House in Bowling Green and you told us about this camp." I had one of those, “is this really happening?” moments as we registered Max for camp. Max enjoyed the 'best week of the summer' as he honed his snare drum skills and grew his leadership skills. It was awesome seeing Max, a nervous 10th grader at Waffle House, enjoy every second of camp that summer. Max is now a section leader for his high school program. I guess the anecdote is – Informing people of the opportunities MFA provides is often times the tipping point for them to have the experience. People can’t experience what they don’t know about. But, once they know, if it matters to them, they will make it a reality in their life.

What would you tell someone who is thinking about donating?
Do it. When we donate to MFA, we give based on the trust and knowledge that our donation is going to support music students and advocacy across our nation.

Join Patrick in making a gift in support of Music for All's impact here.

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

2018 Jazz Band of America

2018 Jazz Band of America

Part of the Music for All National Festival, presented by Yamaha
March 13-16, 2018

The Jazz Band of America features members selected by recorded audition from music programs across the nation. The 2018 Jazz Band of America members first came together Wednesday morning for three days of rehearsals before tonight’s concert. The Jazz Band of America members represent the best high school jazz musicians in America.

Rupert JeffJeff Rupert
2018 Conductor
Director of Jazz Studies, University of Central Florida
Yamaha Performing Artist

Saxophonist Jeff Rupert is a Yamaha performing artist. Performing and recording credits include associations with Diane Schuur, Mel Tormé, Kevin Mahogany, Ernestine Anderson, and Benny Carter’s Grammy winning “Harlem Renaissance.”
Read Full Bio.

 

 

Sean Jones
Guest Artist, Trumpet

Music and spirituality have always been fully intertwined in the artistic vision of trumpeter, composer, educator, and activist Sean Jones. Singing and performing as a child with the church choir in his hometown of Warren, OH, Jones switched from the drums to the trumpet upon his first exposure to Miles Davis at the age of 10 and found further influence upon his discovery of the immortal visionary John Coltrane when he was a 19-yearold classical trumpet performance major at Youngstown State University.
Read Full Bio.

Concert Program Selections

Musical program to be selected from:

The Serpents Tooth .....................................David Milazzo, Saxophone, Vandoren Emerging Artist Winner
Bad Moon ............................................................................................................Jeff Rupert
B.M.O.C. ..............................................................................................................Jeff Rupert
Cuban Fantasy ...................................................................................Ray Bryant/arr. Jeff Rupert
Bad Moon ...........................................................................................................Jeff Rupert
The Eternal Triangle ......................................................................................Edward "Sonny" Stitt
Move, Move, Move .............................................................................Alan Hawkshaw/arr. Jeff Rupert
Smoke Gets in your Eyes .................................... Jerome Kern & Otto Harbach/arr. Michael Phillip Mossman
Spiderman Theme ....................................................................Paul Francis & Bob Harris/arr. Jeff Rupert
The New Creole Love Call ........................................................................................Jeff Rupert
The One For You ................................................................................................ Harry Allen

2018 Jazz Band Members

Ensemble members listed alphabetically.

Alto Saxophone
Aaron Kaufman-Levine – Oak Park River Forest H.S., IL
Ian Munoz – New World School of the Arts, FL

Tenor Saxophone
Jonathan Aviles – The Osceola County School for the Arts, FL
Evan Kappelman – Olathe East H.S., KS

Baritone Saxophone
Noah Barrios – Dr. Phillips H.S., FL

Trumpet
Sam Butler – Fairhope H.S., AL
Summer Camargo – Dillard H.S., FL
Stephane Clement – New World School of the Arts, FL
Jonathan Shillingford – New World School of the Arts, FL
Luca Stine – Florida Virtual School, FL

Trombone
Spencer Banister – Papillion La Vista South H.S., NE
Robert Jones – Belmont H.S., MA
Mick Pepper – Tavares H.S., FL
Jack Trathen – Raleigh Charter H.S., NC

Bass Trombone
Joseph Turgeon – Jesuit H.S., CA

Bass
Calvin Gay – New World School of the Arts, FL

Guitar
Aidan Murrow – Christian Brothers College H.S., MO

Piano
Jason Picker – Canyon Crest Academy, CA

Drumset
Austin Kim – Los Angeles County H.S. for the Arts, CA

Vandoren Emerging Artist, Guest Soloist
David Milazzo, Saxophone

Past Jazz Band of America Members

 Conductor and Guest Artist Biographies

Rupert Jeff

Jeff Rupert
2018 Conductor
Director of Jazz Studies, University of Central Florida

Saxophonist Jeff Rupert is a Yamaha performing artist. Performing and recording credits include associations with Diane Schuur, Mel Tormé, Kevin Mahogany, Ernestine Anderson, and Benny Carter’s Grammy winning “Harlem Renaissance.” Jeff Rupert toured for 15 years with Sam Rivers; four albums ensued, and from 1997- 2002 he toured and recorded with Maynard Ferguson.

Jeff Rupert’s six recordings as a leader all charted on Jazz Week. Do That Again! was #39 out of the top 100 jazz albums of 2014, and “En Plein Air: The Jazz Professors Play Monet” charted on Jazz Week to #29. Performance venues include the Blue Note, Birdland, Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, the Kennedy Center, the Tokyo Forum, the National concert hall of Taipei, Taiwan, and jazz festivals in Europe, Israel, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan.

Rupert’s latest release “Let’s Sail Away” with Veronica Swift, Richard Drexler and Marty Morell was #1 on the jazz charts. As a composer and arranger, Rupert has written for Bob Berg, James Moody, Maynard Ferguson, Kenny Drew Jr., Kevin Mahogany, and Judy Carmichael. Rupert has produced four big band albums for the Flying Horse Big Band, all featuring original compositions and arrangements. Jeff Rupert is Pegasus Professor, Trustee Endowed Chair, and Director of Jazz Studies at the University of Central Florida (UCF), and founder of Flying Horse Records.

Sean Jones
Guest Artist, Trumpet

Music and spirituality have always been fully intertwined in the artistic vision of trumpeter, composer, educator, and activist Sean Jones. Singing and performing as a child with the church choir in his hometown of Warren, OH, Jones switched from the drums to the trumpet upon his first exposure to Miles Davis at the age of 10 and found further influence upon his discovery of the immortal visionary John Coltrane when he was a 19-yearold classical trumpet performance major at Youngstown State University.

After receiving his Master’s Degree, also in classical trumpet performance from Rutgers University, Jones had a six-month stint with the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra. This marked the beginning of a relationship with Wynton Marsalis, who offered Jones a permanent position as lead trumpeter, and Jones remained there until 2010. A highly respected and in-demand musician, Jones was prominently featured with a number of artists, recording and/or performing with major figures including Illinois Jacquet, Jimmy Heath, Frank Foster, Nancy Wilson, Dianne Reeves, Gerald Wilson, and Marcus Miller. The relationship with Miller led to Jones being selected for the Tribute to Miles tour in 2011 with Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter.

The trust and support of those giants led Jones to a decision to focus on performing with his own ensembles, and to begin his longtime relationship with Mack Avenue Records, for whom he has released eight albums. Heavily involved in education, Jones serves as the Berklee College of Music’s Chair of the Brass Department. Jones is current Artist-in-Residence at San Francisco Performances and is a member of The SFJAZZ Collective.

Monday, January 14, 2019

2018 Honor Orchestra of America

Honor Orchestra of America 

Part of the Music for All National Festival, presented by Yamaha
March 14-17, 2018

Music for All’s Honor Orchestra of America is a prestigious ensemble bringing together outstanding high school musicians from across the nation. Members are selected by recorded audition. They will come together for the first time on Wednesday, March 14 in Indianapolis, just days prior to their concert performances.

Livingston Larry

Larry J. Livingston
2018 Conductor & Artistic Director
Chair, Conducting Department, Thornton School of Music
University of Southern California

Mr. Livingston has appeared with the Houston Symphony, the Los Angeles Philharmonic Green Umbrella Series, at the Festival de Musique in France, with the Stockholm Wind Orchestra, the Leopoldinum Orchestra in Poland, the Enescu Philharmonic Orchestra in Rumania, and the Pan Pacific Festival Orchestras in Sydney. Read full bio. 

Ahn Sey

Sey Ahn
Assistant Conductor
Idyllwild Arts Foundation

A 2015 fellow of the American Academy of Conducting at the Aspen Music Festival, Sey Ahn is the Assistant Conductor of the Idyllwild Arts Foundation’s Summer Music Festival and the Music for All Honor Orchestra of America held annually in Indianapolis. She recently served as the Music Director and Professor of Conducting at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and has been a guest conductor of the all-state orchestras of Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Tennessee, Iowa, and Kentucky. Read full bio. 

2018 Concert Program

Procession of the Nobles ................................................................................Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
Symphony No. 5 in D minor, Op. 47 .........................................................................Dmitri Shostakovich

 

2018 Honor Orchestra Members

Ensemble members listed alphabetically. 

Violin
Alain Alvarado – New World School of the Arts, FL
Andrés Caveda – Miami Arts Studio 6-12 at Zelda Glazer, FL
Mikayla Chan – Herricks H.S., NY
Yueci Chen – Mount Pisgah Christian School, GA
John Cho – Woodbridge H.S., CA
Andrew DeWeese – Charlotte Latin School, SC
Noam Elisha – Esperanza H.S., CA
Isabel Evans – Oak Park River Forest H.S., IL
Katie Fair – Maryville H.S., TN
Michelle Fu – Hanford H.S., WA
Solveig Geenen – David H. Hickman H.S., MO
Ashley Gomez – Coral Reef Senior High, FL
Tiffany Jean – Woodbridge H.S., CA
Ye Jin – Valor Christian H.S., CO
Sean Kim – Irvine H.S., CA
Christina Kim – Herricks H.S., NY
Melanie King – Melbourne H.S., FL
Ryan Larson – Avon H.S., IN
Justin Lee – Adlai E. Stevenson H.S., IL
Marcus Mizelle – Avon H.S., IN
Andrew Nguyen – Avon H.S., IN
Minsoo Park – Valor Christian H.S., CO
Angela Ramirez – .Miami Arts Studio 6-12 at Zelda Glazer, FL
Edwin Ramos – Mt. Eden H.S., CA
Catherine Sager – Homeschool, FL
Julia Sellman – The Eclectic Preparatory Academy of Learning, GA
Hannah Simmon – Avon H.S., IN
Claire Tseng – Buchholz H.S., FL

Viola
Bryan Back – duPont Manual H.S., KY
Ritika Bhadouriya – Fishers H.S., IN
Stephanie Chung – Portola H.S., CA
Caroline Emenaker – Avon H.S., IN
Zachary Huang Ogata – Northwood H.S., CA
Claire Kim – Woodbridge H.S., CA
Jae Hwan Lee – Northwood H.S., CA
Adam Savage – Homeschool, FL
Alexandra Spees – Avon H.S., IN
Megan Xu – Great Neck North H.S., NY

Cello
Jasmina Buljubasic – Mt. Eden H.S., CA
David Choi – Northwood H.S., CA
Andrew Do – Northwood H.S., CA
Sheridan Eggers – Zionsville Community H.S., IN
Grace Gill – Lakewood H.S., OH
Claire Jang – Sage H.S., CA
Phebe Sager – Homeschool, FL
Wooyoung Son – Portola H.S., CA
Jennifer Sun – Avon H.S., IN
Jazmine Susana – Avon H.S., IN
Je hoon Yoo – University H.S., CA
Ainslee Zou – Concord H.S., IN

Bass
Nicholas Caux – Maryville H.S., TN
Hollie Greenwood – Roswell H.S., GA
Jackson Hudgins – Avon H.S., IN
Jacob Kolodny – Germantown Academy, PA
Angela Leeper – Ola H.S., GA
Diego Martinez – Houston H.S., TN
Broner McCoy – Franklin H.S., TN
Shane Savage – Homeschool, FL
Chelsea Strayer – San Marcos H.S., CA
Sungwon Woo – Irvine H.S., CA

Flute
Yingyin Chen – Oakton H.S., VA
Abby Losos – Aledo H.S., TX
Annie Zhao – Montgomery Blair H.S., MD

Oboe
Andres Ayola – LaGuardia H.S., NY
Robert Diaz – Interlochen Arts Academy, FL

Bassoon
Jordan Dreyer – West Milford H.S., NJ
James Smelley – Hillcrest H.S., AL

Clarinet
Ji Heon Kim – Fort Lee H.S., NJ
Julia Qiu – Corona del Sol H.S., AZ
Ashrey Shah – Portales H.S., NM

Contrabassoon
Mitchell Dubin – Pittsburgh Creative and Performing Arts 6-12, PA

French Horn
Brianna Garcon. – Dillard Center for the Arts, FL
Molly Kaplan – Hagerty H.S., FL
Hannah Kim – Marriotts Ridge H.S., MD
James Picarello – Frank Sinatra School of the Arts, NY
Logan Pierce – Cypress Creek H.S., TX

Trumpet
Quincy Erickson – Eden Prairie H.S., MN
James Hong – Mounds View H.S., MN
Shuzo Katayama – Fort Lee H.S., NJ
Ernest Miranda – Upland H.S., CA

Trombone
Michael Barski – Park City H.S., UT
Trevor Kimbrell – Wando H.S., SC

Bass Trombone
Matthew DeRossett – Lafayette H.S., KY

Tuba
Ethyn Evans – Sulphur H.S., LA

Percussion
Chandler Beaugrand – Interlochen Arts Academy, FL
Rudra Gautam – Eastside H.S., FL
Jonathan Lucke – Rossview H.S., TN
Reilly McLean – Kell H.S., GA
Jakob Schoenfeld – Interlochen Arts Academy, FL
Elijah Shina – Youth Performing Arts School, KY

Past Honor Orchestra of America Members

Conductor and Music Director Biographies

Livingston Larry

Larry J. Livingston, 2018 Conductor & Artistic Director

Livingston has appeared with the Houston Symphony, the Los Angeles Philharmonic Green Umbrella Series, at the Festival de Musique in France, with the Stockholm Wind Orchestra, the Leopoldinum Orchestra in Poland, the Enescu Philharmonic Orchestra in Rumania, and the Pan Pacific Festival Orchestras in Sydney. The lead jurist for the Besancon International Conducting Competition in France and the Winnipeg Symphony International Conducting Symposium, Maestro Livingston is also the Music Director of the Festival Orchestra at Idyllwild Arts.

Since 2004, Livingston has served as guest conductor at the College Band Directors National Conference in Alice Tully Hall, led All-State Ensembles across the United States including Texas, where he appeared for a record ninth time. From 2004-2012, Livingston was Music Director of Thornton School Orchestras. In recent years, Maestro Livingston conducted the All-State Ensembles of Arizona, New Mexico, Kentucky, Colorado, Illinois, Massachusetts, Iowa, Texas, and California, as well as the Katowice Academy Orchestra in Poland.

Livingston has held positions as vice president of the New England Conservatory of Music, Dean of the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University, and Dean of the USC Thornton School of Music, where he Chairs the Conducting Department. Livingston leads the national educational quest, ALL IN, and heads the Education Committee of the Quincy Jones Musiq Consortium.

In 2013, Livingston appeared in the “Lights Out” episode of Glee and was featured as a mentor in the USA Cable Network Television series, “The Moment.” 

Ahn Sey

Sey Ahn, Assistant Conductor

A 2015 fellow of the American Academy of Conducting at the Aspen Music Festival, Sey Ahn is the Assistant Conductor of the Idyllwild Arts Foundation’s Summer Music Festival and the Music for All Honor Orchestra of America held annually in Indianapolis. She recently served as the Music Director and Professor of Conducting at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and has been a guest conductor of the all-state orchestras of Colorado, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Tennessee, Iowa, and Kentucky.

Sey Ahn has led orchestral performances in Walt Disney Concert Hall and Royce Hall in Los Angeles, Benedict Music Tent in Aspen, and Alice Tully Hall in New York. Sey Ahn earned a Bachelor of Music degree in piano performance from Northwestern University, and Master of Music degrees in piano and orchestral conducting from the University of Southern California, where she was a student of Larry Livingston.

She is currently pursuing a Doctorate at the University of Kentucky, where she studies with John Nardolillo, and serves as Assistant Conductor to the University of Kentucky Symphony Orchestra, the UK Philharmonia, and the University of Kentucky Opera Theatre.

Tuesday, January 08, 2019

2018 Honor Band of America

2018 Honor Band of America

Part of the Music for All National Festival, presented by Yamaha
March 14-17, 2018

The Honor Band of America is recognized as one of the nation’s premier honor ensembles. Members were selected by recorded audition, and the standards of acceptance for the Honor Band of America are of the highest level. Members first met Wednesday evening (March 14) for three days of rehearsals before Saturday evening's concert. Honor Band of America alumni play in professional symphonies and ensembles, teach music nationwide, and otherwise represent the best and brightest in their fields.

Weiss Scott Festival 2017Scott Weiss
2018 Conductor
Director of Bands, University of South Carolina

Scott Weiss is the Director of Bands and Sarah Bolick Smith Distinguished Professor of Music at the University of South Carolina, where he conducts the USC Wind Ensemble and teaches graduate conducting.
Read Full Bio.


2018 Concert Program

MLK/RFK ....................................................................................................Mohammed Fairouz

World Premiere

Suite from MASS ....................................................................Leonard Bernstein/arr. Michael Sweeney

Featuring The United States Army Brass Quintet

There Are No Words ............................................................................................James Stephenson
Amazing Grace ..................................................................................................arr.William Hines

2018 Honor Band Members

Flute
Cameron Bilek – Victor J. Andrew H.S., IL
Kelsey Chin – Scarsdale H.S., NY
Evan Curatolo – Lincoln-Way East H.S., IL
Katharine Demos – Henry Clay H.S., KY
Michelle Jeon – Phillips Academy, CA
Anne Kickert – Foxcroft School, VA
Peyton Shinkle – Goose Creek H.S., SC
Emily Shoemaker – Jenks H.S., OK
Lucy Thom – Huntsville H.S., AL

Oboe
Meera Bhatia – Lewis Palmer H.S., CO
Abigail Bracken – Jensen Beach H.S., FL
Jiwon Park – Harvard-Westlake School, CA
Colleen Scott – Ballard H.S., KY

Clarinet
Dana Alward – Satellite H.S., FL
Sophia Bracken – Jensen Beach H.S., FL
Madison Childs – Yorkville H.S., IL
Emily Cooper – Paul Laurence Dunbar H.S., KY
Naomi Farkas – River Hill H.S., MD
Matthew Goodrich – Paul Laurence Dunbar H.S., KY
Christopher Maxwell – Putnam City North H.S., OK
Nadine Meister – Centennial H.S., MD
Joshua Melocoton – A.A. Stagg H.S., IL
Ethan Pham – Cypress Ridge H.S., TX
John Sikorski – Victor J. Andrew H.S., IL
Benjamin Swinchoski – Biotechnology H.S., NJ
Tori Venske – Yukon H.S., OK
Stacey Xiang – Ravenwood H.S., TN
Amy Zhou – Dunlap H.S., IL
Ruisheng Zhouren – Desert Vista H.S., AZ

Bass Clarinet
Simon Bakos – William Mason H.S., OH
Heriberto Castro – Miami Arts Studio @ Zelda Glazer 6-12, FL
Sanika Gupte – John Champe H.S., VA

Bassoon
Phillip Baggio – Victor J. Andrew H.S., IL
Christopher Maldonado – Cuthbertson H.S., NC
Matthew Mitchell – Lafayette H.S., KY
Nicholas Nocita – John Hersey H.S., IL

Saxophone - Alto
Edward Chen – Liberty H.S., TX
Micah Cheng – Jenks H.S., OK
Jason Frazier – Franklin H.S., TN
Veronica Leahy – Charlotte Latin School, NC

Saxophone - Tenor
Lolita Nazarov – Smithtown H.S. East, NY
Austin Sparks – Franklin H.S., TN

Saxophone - Bari
Matthew Smith – Jenks H.S., OK

Trumpet
Diego Alfaro – Mt. Eden H.S., CA
Joseph Ardovino, Jr. – Thompson H.S., AL
Brock Baker – Danville H.S., IL
Adam Dinkins – James Bowie H.S., TX
David Ginn – Wando H.S., SC
Mickayla Hamilton – Goose Creek H.S., SC
Taylor Hubbard – Ravenscroft School, NC
Samuel Mitchell – Desoto Central H.S., MS
Jaden Oldham – Deer Creek H.S., OK
Cary Patterson – Oak Ridge H.S., CA
Mikayla Sweet – Deer Creek H.S., OK
Grant Teserovitch – Centerville H.S., OH
Caleb Walker – Oak Mountain H.S., AL
Tyrone Williamson. – Athens Drive H.S., NC

French Horn
Sarah Austin – Cuthbertson H.S., NC
Maxwell Finley – Mt. Eden H.S., CA
Marcus Franck – Thompson H.S., AL
Cooper Freeman – Cypress Creek H.S., TX
Megan Lao – Hillcrest H.S., AL
Steven Locastro – Thompson H.S., AL
Dominick Neville – Tarpon Springs H.S., FL
Joel Persell – Cypress Creek H.S., TX
Phoebe Saboley – Thomas Worthington H.S., OH
Isaac Sepulveda – Dillard Center for the Arts, FL
Tin Van – Cypress Creek H.S., TX
Christian Walker – Thompson H.S., AL

Trombone
Travis Cooke – Oconomowoc H.S., WI
John Dvorak – .Maria Carrillo H.S., CA
Russ Garayanala – Hillcrest H.S., AL
Axel Garcia – Mt. Eden H.S., CA
Annabel Grocott – Cuthbertson H.S., NC
Rohil Javer – .Naperville North H.S., IL
Andrew Lyons – William Mason H.S., OH
Kathryn Meldrum – Oakton H.S., MA
Andrew Phillips – Morton H.S., IL
Ethan Rabb – Wando H.S., SC
Katie Thornton – Franklin H.S., TN

Euphonium
Tyler Demsheck – Wando H.S., SC
Christopher Harrison – Madison Central H.S., KY
Ellen Lee – Madison Central H.S., KY
Nikolai Mukhin – Wando H.S., SC

Tuba
Jacob Alford – Lafayette H.S., KY
Colleen Duggan – Loveland H.S., CO
Thomas Gerald – Catalina Foothills H.S., AZ
Jacob Kopis – Martinsville H.S., IN
Kofi Mosley-Kellum – Wando H.S., SC
Travis Young – Southwest Dekalb H.S., GA

Percussion
Matthew Boyle – Fort Collins H.S., CO
Nicholas Burzumato – Harrisonburg H.S., VA
Hammaad Hassan – Mt. Eden H.S., CA
Mark Larrivee – Norwood H.S., MA
Brandon Meadows – The Colony H.S., TX
John Miller – Madison Central H.S., KY
Ford Smith – Youth Performing Arts School, KY

Past Honor Band of America Members

Conductor Biography

Weiss Scott Festival 2017

Scott Weiss
2018 Conductor
Director of Bands, University of South Carolina

Scott Weiss is the Director of Bands and Sarah Bolick Smith Distinguished Professor of Music at the University of South Carolina, where he conducts the USC Wind Ensemble and teaches graduate conducting. Under his direction, the USC Wind Ensemble has performed before the College Band Directors National Association (2013), the American Bandmasters Association (2014), and the South Carolina Music Educators Association (2012/2017). A strong supporter of new music, Scott Weiss has commissioned and premiered dozens of new works, and he has critically-acclaimed recordings on the Naxos, Summit, and Mark Custom labels. Equally at home conducting wind ensembles and symphony orchestras, he maintains an active international conducting schedule, including recent performances in China with the Hunan Symphony Orchestra, the Inner Mongolia Symphony Orchestra, the Shenzhen Symphony Orchestra, the Nanchang Philharmonic, and the Shandong Symphony Orchestra.

Monday, January 07, 2019

2020 Festival Performance Schedule

Music for All National Festival, presented by Yamaha
Performance Schedule

UPDATE – On Thursday, March 12, the Governor of Indiana issued a mandate that the gathering of non-essential groups of 250 members or more is prohibited. Due to this mandate, Butler University's performance halls and facilities are unavailable to us. We have concluded the Music for All National Festival as of Friday evening and have completed all musical performances and activities.

Ensembles and participants have been notified and departure arrangements are being made for those on-site.

Our mission remains to create, provide, and expand positively life-changing experiences through music for all. Our vision is to be a catalyst to ensure that every child across America has access and opportunity to active music-making in his or her scholastic environment.

We, like every American and citizen of the world, are hopeful and expectant that we will all persevere and never compromise on our belief in music, music in our schools, and music for all.

Governor Holcomb's full statement is here:

https://calendar.in.gov/site/gov/event/gov-holcomb-announces-new-steps-to-protect-public-from-covid-19/

Monday, November 26, 2018

Tomorrow is #GivingTuesday!

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During my nine years with Music for All, I have had the absolute pleasure to witness over 1 million students go through Music for All programming. Their experiences with Music for All have been part of their journey for excellence in personal development, ensemble achievement, leadership, teamwork, and the creation of art.  

In my current role at Music for All, I work to raise money through sponsorships, grants, and through donations from individuals like you. Thanks to you, we are able to help support and sustain our current programming, but even more importantly, to further Music for All’s vision to ensure that EVERY child across America has access and opportunity to engage in active music-making in their scholastic environment. 

I’m here, not only as an employee of Music for All but as an active donor myself, because I believe 100% that the experiences and life skills that students receive through music education (and Music for All programming) are not only important, but essential in helping to create a better world full of people who have empathy for each other and know how to work together toward a common goal. 

On #GivingTuesday, and throughout the end of this year, I urge you to consider showing your support of Music for All through a donation to the 2019 Music for All Summer Symposium Scholarship Fund.

I’d like to share an excerpt from a "thank you" letter that we received from a past Summer Symposium Scholarship recipient. Trinity is able to put her experience into words in a way I cannot of why these experiences are so important.

“I’d like to thank you for the Scholarship to Summer Symposium. I learned many valuable things. Not only did it provide me with the opportunity to have an insight into college life, but I also was provided with lessons that I will be able to use for the rest of my life. The teachers and even the SWAGs inspired me to pursue what I want in college. They taught me that it’s okay to be different and that no matter where you go, there will always be someone to challenge you.

I was also having trouble deciding what colleges to apply for. Seeing the Ball State campus and students enjoying their time there makes me want to apply even more. Going to Summer Symposium helped me stop being afraid of college and learn to embrace the opportunities that come with it.

Not only did I discover all these things, but I also discovered myself. When I came to the Symposium for the first time I was very introverted and insecure. This place and all these people helped me come out of my shell, to become more confident in myself and my decision-making. The people taught me many valuable things, but out of everything, the most valuable concept I learned was to be a leader. 

Being a leader has helped me become more than just a listener. It has taught me to follow what I believe, speak my opinion, and be committed in every aspect of life. This leadership is a skill that is helpful in school, but in real life as well. Leadership has assisted in overcoming my anxiety. I don’t let anxiety hold me back anymore. For this, and for everything else, I thank you." 

 - Trinity, Summer Symposium Scholarship Recipient 

Please help us ensure that even more students, like Trinity, can have these types of experiences that will set them up for success for the rest of their lives. 

In 2018 alone, Music for All programs reached more than 144,000 participants. If even 25% of those who participated this year each donated $5 that would be $180,000 that we could raise to help provide access and opportunity to more students across the country.   

If music education has been an important part of your and your family's life… pay it forward this holiday season. $5, $10, $15 – any amount can make a difference and help make sure someone else has the same opportunity that you did.   

If you can’t give monetarily this year, you can still give. I’d love to hear from you about how being involved with Music for All has impacted your life. Email me and share your story! Even better, consider sharing that story online as well and encourage your friends and family to donate this holiday season.

Wishing you the very best this Holiday season,

 

Erin Signature

DonateButton

For #GivingTuesday 2018, all donations received from 8:00 a.m. ET (5:00 a.m. PT) on Tuesday, November 27th, 2018 through Facebook Fundraising will be matched by Facebook and Paypal. The matching offer will expire when $7 million in donations is reached or at 11:59 p.m. PT on November 27th. The button above will take you to Music for All's Fundraising Page on Facebook.

If you would like to support Music for All, but do not want to use the Facebook platform, you can also make a donation directly through Music for All's website  (this will not be counted toward the Facebook/Paypal match but is certainly appreciated).

 

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Music for All is proud to be a part of this global celebration of giving. 
Join us in supporting the 2019 Summer Symposium Scholarship Fund on #GivingTuesday 2018!

Created by New York’s 92nd Street Y and United Nations Foundation in 2012, #GivingTuesday is a global holiday that celebrates generosity and kindness by giving to nonprofit organizations all around the world. While Black Friday and Cyber Monday start off the buying season, #GivingTuesday starts off the giving season. 

Please consider joining Music for All this year on #GivingTuesday, November 27, with a donation to support 2019 Summer Symposium Scholarships.

Because of our generous supporters, we were able to award 194 scholarships for students to attend America’s Camp last year leveling the playing field for young musicians with financial need to be part of a truly life-changing experience!

Still, countless students each year are unable to attend due to their financial situation. At Music for All, we believe that every student deserves to have access and opportunity to participate in active music making. That is why we provide both full and partial scholarships to support deserving students.

This summer, America’s Camp celebrates its 44th anniversary! That will be 44 years of giving student musicians and music educators an opportunity to be part of an invaluable weeklong immersive learning camp that prepares them for the future.

The 1,700+ students and educators who attend camp this year will leave with heightened…

  • Leadership skills
  • Confidence through meaningful music creation
  • Instrumental knowledge
  • Performance skills

Our programs are making a difference, but there are more students for us to reach.

It is my hope that you will join me and give your most generous gift today so we can achieve our mission and support more students this summer than ever.

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

2018 Bands of America Results

Results, as announced at the awards ceremonies, will be posted here as soon as possible following the conclusion of each awards ceremony. Full recaps are posted by Monday morning, earlier if possible. If a link below is not yet live, the results are not yet posted.

November 8-10, 2018

Grand National Championships – Lucas Oil Stadium

November 2-3, 2018

San Antonio, TX – SUPER REGIONAL – The Alamodome

November 3, 2018

Southern California – L.A. Valley College

October 26-27, 2018

St. Louis, MO – SUPER REGIONAL – The Dome at America's Center

October 27, 2018

Powder Springs, GA – McEachern H.S.

St. George, UT – Dixie State University

October 19-20, 2018

Indianapolis, IN SUPER REGIONAL – Lucas Oil Stadium

October 20, 2018

Newark, DE – University of Delaware

Pleasant Hill, CA – Diablo Valley College

October 13, 2018

Orlando, FL – Camping World Stadium

Canton, OH – Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium

Gaffney, SC – Gaffney H.S.

Waco, TX – Waco ISD Stadium

  • The Regional at Waco was canceled due to weather.

October 6, 2018

Jacksonville, AL – Jacksonville State University

Bedford, TX – Pennington Field

Houston, TX – Woodforest Bank Stadium

September 29, 2018

Austin, TX – Kelly Reeves Athletic Complex

Bowling Green, OH – Bowling Green State University

Clarksville, TN – Austin Peay State University

September 22, 2018

Oxford, OH – Miami University

McAllen, TX – DQ Fan Field at Veterans Memorial Stadium

Midland, TX – Grande Communications Stadium

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