Emily Ambriz
Emily Ambriz

Emily Ambriz is the Senior Marketing Coordinator with Music for All and has been part of the team since May 2017. She mainly focuses on all things digital including: social media management, web management, and email campaigns. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Public Relations from Ball State University in May 2017 and is currently pursuing her Master of Arts in Public Relations with a concentration in Media Analytics from Ball State University. She is well versed in the arts non-profit world as a previous Drum Corps International Intern and Music for All Administrative Assistant. When she's not chasing the latest social media trends, Ambriz can be found planning her next trip across the pond or binge listening to true crime podcasts.

Where do I begin to describe the most memorable moments of the Rose Parade?! I have so many. Here are just a few:

I was on the bus with the color guard, and we were heading to the beach. On the way there, someone starting singing “Who Says” by Miley Cyrus. Then someone else joined in, and suddenly there was a big group of us color guard girls singing the song on the top of our lungs and dancing. It was a great song about how we are reminded that we are perfect the way we are, but even more special because we all sang it together.

On the parade route itself, we were over halfway done, and my feet were killing me. I was cold and tired and thirsty. I wanted to stop performing for a little bit just to get my energy up. This guy had a sign that said 3 miles left. Then a lady next to him had a sign that said “he’s lying.” We (the color guard) laughed at it. It lifted my spirits and made it easier to finish the parade! At the end of the parade, the drumline finished their last cadence, and we started dancing to finish it out. I couldn’t believe I actually finished marching an international parade!

I think one of the biggest things I still talk about today, other than performing You Raise Me Up at Bandfest, was the reception after the parade. I was super lucky to go on the trip with my best friend, Maija, she plays clarinet, and any moment I wasn’t with the color guard, I was with the clarinets. At the ceremony, the clarinets and I started dancing, and Maija and I started teaching them to dance cumbia. Someone started a conga line, and we danced around the whole floor. I know all our feet had ached from the parade, but we kept dancing anyway. I loved every moment.

At Bandfest, we performed You Raise Me Up, and I remember having the pre-show jitters. I was focused on making sure I remembered everything from rehearsal the days before. After, hearing the first chord and feeling chills up my spine, I wasn’t nervous anymore. I felt my smile grow bigger. I saw United Sound performing, and it was just so wholesome. I got to stand in the center of the field dancing and spinning with the color guard I just met but was already made great memories with, and it brought some tears to my eyes. There was pride in the music we were playing, and the crowd was reciprocating the emotions. It was a beautiful performance that I will never forget!

I had the trip of a lifetime! Thank you all for the memories!

To be honest, I could write an ENTIRE blog about my trip not just one post! I would write about how one random person I took a selfie with at Disneyland ended up going to college with me and we have been best friends and drum majors for 3 years.

I would write about all of the countless reunions I have had with members of the band since 2017; how the Rose Bowl Stadium ended up being my college home stadium; or how my best friend and I became such close friends with people we met in the band we ended up staying in Ohio for a few days with them after DCI Finals.

But, my most memorable moment is from the beginning.
It is funny, even though the week of BOA TOR 2017 was the most fun and enjoyable week of my life, the moment I will always cherish is when I got the email saying I was accepted into the 2017 Bands of America Honor Band in the Rose Parade early in 2016. I had spent four years waiting to audition, as the seniors from my freshman year of high school had participated in the 2013 Honor Band.

I spent lots of time asking about their experience in the band, and listening to them tell their stories and every single time I thought to myself "I am going to do that." To be quite honest, at that point in my life, it was the biggest thing I had ever been sure of.

I didn't know what I wanted to do after high school, I didn't know what I wanted to be when I grew up, and I didn't even know what I wanted to have for breakfast the next day. But I knew that I wanted to be in the 2017 Bands of America Tournament of Roses Honor Band.

There were also 7 other students from my school's band program that auditioned, so that Friday morning, we were all nervous wrecks outside the band room, refreshing our emails over and over and being ready to celebrate or console our fellow members once the notification emails came out. I remember one of our trombone players got his announcement first, and we all tried to figure out what the algorithm was. Was there an order to the emails being sent out? Some pattern to this madness?

Then, the time came. I had received my email, and at that moment nothing was more important. I got in! The other 6 members received their emails as well, and that morning there were rounds and rounds of hugs, congrats, and sighs of relief. I even remember our band director being out there with us. And there, that memorable moment, was where this whole amazing journey started.

I ended up publishing a vlog with more memorable moments from my experience:

Students with an entrepreneurial vision, songwriting and composing skills, are as highly recruited as those with advanced music theory knowledge. Students are becoming more aware of the many career paths available to them in the music entertainment industry: movies, television programs and commercials, podcasts, video games, streaming content, and recordings. And high schools are finding they need to incorporate instruction in composition, orchestration, arranging, and songwriting into class curriculum to help the student make college and career decisions. So what does that mean for the scholastic music educators?

Scholastic music educators--choral directors, band directors, and orchestra directors—now need to incorporate arranging and songwriting in their curriculum from early grades through high school to give their students a competitive edge in the collegiate application and audition process. Students with these skills are in high demand, and in fact, several Schools of Music over the past five years have offered scholarships to songwriters and rappers because of their potential ability to bring copyright and publishing royalties into their coffers. Several universities have stated that a student’s advanced placement theory credits are weighted less in the admission decision process than a songwriting submission, especially if the song follows proper song structure.

Additionally, many School of Music and Music Department recruiters are looking for students with an entrepreneurial mindset. Recruiters have realized the US media and entertainment industry is the largest in the world and there are now over 20 colleges or universities offering an undergraduate degree in Music Entrepreneurship. At $717 billion (in 2019) in the US alone, music represented 1/3 of global media and entertainment. This industry includes motion pictures, television programs and commercials, broadcasts, radio, video games, and ancillary services and products. In 2019, the music industry was ranked 11th in the US economy and it is predicted the industry will reach more than $825 billion by 2023.

Collegiate music education is a business. Colleges, universities, and conservatories must make a profit. A growing trend among many Music Departments is to have publishing and recording companies within the department, where they publish new music from professors, students, and alumni, as well as educational resources and curriculums. Music Departments also depend on tuition and student fees, such as lab fees and tutoring fees. And they sell services—master classes, camps, symposiums, and ensemble weekends—as well as showcasing seniors in musical theatre before Broadway producers, opera singers in New York for talent agencies, and instrumentalists before the American Symphony League.

The face of collegiate recruiting has changed and will, in light of COVID-19 and its repercussions, continue to evolve. Scholastic music educators will find themselves with new challenges as they strive to help students and their parents navigate the collegiate music application and audition process.

ScholarshipAuditions.com is the premier site for resources for teachers, parents, and students to help in this new, evolving world. And we are proud to announce that Eric Martin, former CEO of Music for All, has joined ScholarshipAuditions.com as its President. Mr. Martin and Randall Bayne, founder and CEO, are committed to assisting students, along with their teachers and parents, navigate these ever-changing and somewhat treacherous waters to find the scholarship opportunities best suited for their career goals. Visit ScholarshipAuditions.com today and explore the possibilities and connections available to help you and your students, especially during this challenging year.

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

The Virtues of Virtual Acoustics

Many schools built in the 60’s and 70’s have music rooms that resemble typical math or science rooms: small cubic volume, low ceilings, poor soundproofing and inferior or no acoustical treatments.

That was unfortunately the case at Jefferson High School in Bloomington, Minnesota. Knowing that there were no plans for new construction in the near future, Choir Director Philip Brown pleaded with the school administration to improve the room.

“We talked about options and our superintendent said, ‘Let’s do it right the first time.’ He asked what the best solution was, and we liked the idea of virtual acoustics,” Brown says.

A virtual acoustics system includes an array of microphones and speakers placed strategically in the music room to digitally alter and improve the acoustics of a space. These systems can also go beyond that capability and mimic the acoustics of a broad range of performance venues — from a large recital hall to a cathedral to a small auditorium. The goal is to help performers hear what they’ll sound like at a venue they’ll be performing in. It helps them hear themselves and each other and know when and how to adjust to improve the overall performance.

Hearing is Believing

Brown had experienced virtual acoustics firsthand at the national American Choral Director’s Convention at the Minneapolis Convention Center. He watched a demonstration of Wenger’s VAE® (Virtual Acoustic Environment) Rehearsal System and quickly realized how much it could help solve their acoustical problems.

“It was fascinating to see how the singers made modifications using the VAE system versus not having anything at all,” Brown says. “That was the biggest thing to me as a music educator. How are the singers responding to it?”

“The power of the system comes in so many angles,” he explains. “It heightens everything to a different educational and performance level.” He was able to convince school administration and the system was installed.

Custom Installation

Jefferson’s virtual acoustics system was made specifically by Wenger for smaller settings, such as classrooms. The system isn’t a new concept, but it’s nimble enough – and affordable enough – that classrooms in colleges and high schools across the country are finding that it’s a solid solution to help their students get more out of their rehearsal time.

“The Wenger Acoustic Team came in and explained what they would do to work with the low ceilings and two different ceiling heights and how they would make it work,” Brown says.

He describes the old room as “dead.” He says singers would overcompensate, push too hard, and get tired, affecting their technique. “Virtual acoustics increase your sensation of what’s coming back to you, so you can stay with a healthier technique for a longer period of time,” Brown says. “The system adds energy back into the room and provides a teaching tool for the instructor,” says Matt Hildebrand, Acoustics Product Manager at Wenger Corporation. “When the system is off, the classroom is quiet and perfect for verbal instruction or teaching theory.”

The Benefits of Better Sound

Users frequently site these three things that they enjoy most about the system:

  • It’s easy to use. The environment can be changed with the touch of a button, even from the podium where the control panel is positioned.
  • The different acoustic environments are preset and offer flexibility as well as custom settings. The nine settings include studio, baroque, medium recital hall, large recital hall, medium auditorium, large auditorium, cathedral and a custom setting.
  • Digital record and playback capabilities work with any of the nine acoustical settings for immediate listening in rehearsal, archiving or creating an audition recording.

Before the system was installed, Brown says his students did not enjoy singing in the choir room.

“After adding the system, we did a total flip and the kids were very excited to get in here and experiment with it,” Brown says.

There is a custom setting that mirrors the acoustics of the school’s auditorium which helps them practice without having to occupy the performance space.

“We only get so many rehearsals in our auditorium before our concerts because it is a space that gets reserved for a lot of events and activities,” Brown explains. “Now, they walk into the hall and there are no surprises, so it takes us less time to acclimate.”

Using the system during rehearsals, Brown likes to sample different settings. If they are practicing a baroque piece, they can use the baroque setting and transcend the class into a different time period.

Brown says the system helps eliminate the unknowns and builds confidence in his students.

“There’s an arena setting to prepare us for a national anthem stadium performance. We can actually rehearse in an arena setting so the kids will know how much feedback they’re going to get and how much echo there’s going to be so they can respond to it. When we arrive, the group is prepared and can sound their best.”

Record, Listen and Learn

For both teacher and student, the record and playback functions allow for learning and adjustment. Brown says it gives the students more ownership of the performance and constant reflection about what they are hearing. They can perform something two different ways, listen to both and decide which they like better.

They can use the VAE Rehearsal system with the entire choir working together, or in small groups. If students are not in class at the same time, they can record their session and the second group can use their recording as an accompaniment.

It has also come in handy for submitting competition and scholarship recordings.

Worthwhile Investment

With every “wow” moment that students experience when hearing the system for the first time, Brown’s decision to install the system is solidified. As he sees each class of students learn, grow and improve, he knows that students for years to come will reap the benefits.

“The students can now go so much further. They know how to listen and improve. It allows them to have flexibility so whatever environment they play in they can be comfortable and feel successful in those environments. It really makes a difference at an incredibly high-quality level.”

Gracie Moore of Lake Braddock Secondary School in Burke, Virginia was awarded The Revelli Scholarship in connection to the 2020 Music for All National Festival, presented by Yamaha.

The Revelli Scholarship is a $1,000 award given annually to a senior who will be attending college as a music education major and who is participating in the Music for All National Festival. The scholarship honors the legacy and memory of Dr. William D. Revelli and his vision for music education.

In addition to being the principal bassoon for the Lake Secondary School Symphonic Band and Symphony Orchestra for two years, Gracie has performed in the All-District Band for four years, two on clarinet and two on bassoon. As a drum major at Lake Braddock Secondary School, she has a passion for music that she wants to share with as many people as possible and believes music is an important part to a curriculum. She looks forward to becoming a music educator, and hopes to inspire the future generation of musicians!

Congratulations to the 2020 Revelli Scholarship Recipient, Gracie Moore!

The University of North Texas (UNT) College of Music has the largest enrollment for public university music programs in the U.S. and is one of the world's most respected comprehensive music schools.

Its Bruce Hall dormitory is home to the Music & Jazz Living Learning Communities and cultivates a rich, creative environment for all its residents. Since 1964, 100 UNT College of Music alumni have worked on projects nominated for Grammy Awards, and an incredible 53 of those have won the prestigious award.

One of the secrets to student success is supplying them with the equipment necessary to succeed. First-rate practice rooms with advanced acoustical technology fall into that category. To make sure students could get the most out of their practice time, the school partnered with Wenger to install brand new Wenger SoundLok® Sound-Isolation Rooms with the latest Virtual Acoustic Environment (VAE®) technology in Bruce Hall, home to hundreds of student musicians.

Remove and Refurbish

UNT was one of the first schools in the country to install Wenger sound isolation practice rooms. For 45 years, those rooms served thousands of students well. But the rooms were in need of repairs. The college was interested in learning about new features and new technology that new rooms could provide.

“The design had changed significantly over the years, so we couldn’t make repairs in a cost-effective way,” explains Neal Jorgenson of Wenger Corporation. “The fans also weren’t working very well anymore, so it was uncomfortable for the students in the rooms. UNT agreed to install new rooms to give the musicians a much better place to play.”

Records indicated the old rooms had been used 6,700 times in the 2016-2017 academic year alone. It was no wonder they needed replacing.

The process began with a site visit so that Jorgenson could see the existing practice rooms. Right away, he noticed a big problem.

“There were some 9-foot high beams in the rooms that we needed to tear out,” Jorgenson says. “We need at least ten feet of height, so we drew up the plans, got some feedback from UNT, and had to vet everything through the fire marshal. Then we began tearing out the old rooms and making room for the new.”

Install and Instruct

Jorgenson’s team installed 13 Wenger SoundLok® Sound-Isolation Rooms with built-in VAE technology.

VAE technology offers more realistic acoustical simulations, creating the sensation of being enveloped by the sound. This innovative approach enables musicians to hear themselves in various performance venues, from a large recital hall to a cathedral to a small auditorium. VAE allows the musicians to record and play back their practice sessions, helping them adapt and improve their performance. Those recordings can also be downloaded to other devices for sharing or performing accompaniments.

The sound isolation rooms are quieter than any other on the market. They’re also strategically located in the basement of Bruce Hall, allowing its residents to practice at any time of day without disturbing anyone nearby.

VAE technology also allows teachers to follow the assessment strategy recommended in the National Standards for Music Education, and increase their ability to evaluate the progress of more students in less time.

“The students were very excited to explore this technology,” explains Penny Gustafson, Assistant Director of Housing and Business Operations at UNT. “Given the creative drive of our typical music majors, we were confident that these rooms would be beneficial.”

The final step was for a team of acoustical equipment experts to show the students and teachers how to use the system to maximize its benefits.

New Rooms, Clear Sound

The new rooms were a big hit.

“The students love the VAE technology,” Gustafson says. “They particularly enjoy being able to record themselves and track progress over the course of the semester or year. Music professors were also eager to listen to their students’ recordings and offer feedback.”

Gustafson says students have also found the spaces useful for recording podcasts, music for personal projects, or sound clips for film. The rooms are used an average of 500 hours each week. Because of their popularity, UNT had to implement a one-hour limit per person to give all residents an opportunity to use the rooms.

The practice rooms are also used as a recruiting tool, providing a major draw for prospective freshmen music majors and their families when considering their options for undergraduate music studies.

Throughout the process, Gustafson appreciated the customer service Jorgenson provided.

“Neal has been extremely informative, patient, and supportive,” Gustafson says. “When we hit bumps in the road with project management, we called on him to intervene, and he always took care of us.”

Long List of Wenger Products

The SoundLok practice rooms join other Wenger Corporation products elsewhere on campus. The auditorium boasts a beautiful Diva® Full Stage Acoustical Shell to help both performers on stage and audience members hear the best possible sound. The rooms also contain StageTek® seated risers, as well as musician and cello chairs and Wenger’s Classic 50® Music Stands.

Wenger Corporation’s hallmark is to build quality, durable, lasting products that stand the test of time.

SoundLok rooms that lasted 45 years prove the point. And now, the new and improved rooms will serve thousands of future students for many more years to come.

Susan L. Smith, Music for All Educational Consultant, kicks off a new live webinar series exclusively on BAND, the mobile app in the Director Hub.

The webinar will focus on concert festival preparation for young or small bands. 

This FREE Webinar will include tips for success for the concert band conductor with a small or young band. The first half of this online clinic will be informative with suggestions that have worked for the clinician in the past.

The second half will focus on specific questions or needs of the attendees.

Fill out the form below to ensure your questions get answered! The webinar will be available in the Director hub at the conclusion of the event.

Join the hub and RSVP here: https://band.us/band/76115568

Question form: https://www.tfaforms.com/4803102

Stop by the Music for All booth and talk with the following members of our Education team



Susan Smith will be in the booth on Wednesday, 12/18 from 2:00-4:00 p.m. to talk about the National Chamber Music Festival and small band initiatives for marching bands!



Come meet Music for All Educational Consultant Zachary Harris, adjunct professor at William Carey University. Zachary will be in the booth each daydiscussing our urban education initiatives and the I-65 Corridor Collaborative.

Wed. 12/18 - 9:30 a.m. – Noon
Thurs. 12/19 - 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Fri. 12/20 - 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.



Let’s talk about the Honor Band in the Rose Parade®! January 15, 2020 is the application and audition deadline for students.

Meet with Richard Saucedo on Thursday 12/19 from 9:00-11:00 a.m. to learn more.

        

Want to learn more about Music for All Affiliate Regional Music Festivals and the Directors’ Academy at the Music for All National Festival?

Scott Casagrande and Stan Schoonover will be available on Thursday from 11:00 a.m. – Noon to talk with you.



David Starnes, our Summer Symposium Camp Director will be available on Thursday 12/19 from 9:00-11:00 am to talk about summer camp and the many opportunities for students and directors.



Having worked with Fran Kick for over two decades, Music for All shares in his passion and mission to develop student leadership in all students, rather than just let it happen with a selected few. Come by on Friday 12/20 from 9 a.m.-Noon to talk about student leadership opportunities at the Summer Symposium!

Check out the following Music for All master educators and clinicians at the 2019 Midwest Band & Orchestra Clinic!

Bobby Lambert, Wando H.S., SC: Wind Symphony Performance; Thursday, December 19, 8:30 a.m. Skyline Ballroom W375E

Cheryl Floyd, Hill Country M.S., TX retired: “Once More with Feeling: The Music Really Matters”; Friday, December 20, 8:30 a.m. Ballroom W183

Daniel Malacon, Timber Creek H.S., TX: Timber Creek Saxophone Ensemble Performance; Thursday, December 19, 4:30 p.m. Ballroom W190

Dave Gerhart, Yamaha Corporation of America: “Percussion Methods 102: Revisited”; Thursday December 19, 4:30 p.m. Meeting Room W186

Dr. Tim Lautzenheiser, Music for All Senior Educational Advisor: Music Parents Sessions, Wednesday December 18, 4:30 p.m. and Thursday December 19, 2:00 p.m. Meeting room W193 and “It is Better to Illuminate than to Shine: A Credo for All Teachers and Conductors”, Thursday December19, 3:00 p.m. Meeting Room W185 Moderator for “An Interview with Julie Giroux” Friday December 20, 10:30 a.m. Ballroom W183

Freddy Martin, Westminster Schools, GA: “Go Play Outside! A Contextual Discussion on the Benefits, Drawbacks, and Stigmas associated with Outdoor Brass Playing”; Thursday December 19, 11:30 a.m. Meeting Room W184

H. Robert Reynolds, Thornton School of Music at the University of Southern California Chat Room “The Two Kinds of Knowledge and the Two Kinds of Conductors” Wednesday December 18, 11:30 a.m. Meeting Room W193 2nd Annual Midwest Clinic Reynolds Conducting Institute Thursday December 19, 10:00 a.m & 2:30 p.m. & Friday Decmeber 20, 9:00 a.m. Meeting Room W178 Open Rehearsal with the University of Texas (Austin) Chamber Winds; Thursday December 19, 1:30 p.m. Meeting Room W178 Guest conductor, Players from the University of Texas (Austin) Wind Ensemble; Saturday December 21 10:00 a.m. Ballroom W183

Jarrett Lipman and Alan Sharps, Claudia Taylor Johnson H.S., TX: Wind Ensemble Performance;Thursday December 19, 1:00 p.m., Skyline Ballroom W375AB

Jeffrey Grogan, Oklahoma City University, OK: “Leading Rehearsals that Inspire”; Wednesday December 18, 10:30 a.m. Ballroom W183

Jerrell Horton, Vestavia Hills H.S., AL: “Relationships that Resonate: Creating a Culture of Leadership and Inclusion through United Sound”; Wednesday December 18, 3:00 p.m. Meeting Room W186

John Phillips, University of Western Ontario retired: “The Concert was Great! But What Did They Learn? Using Reflective Practice to Support Student Achievement”; Friday December 20, 10:30 a.m. Meeting Room W186

Jon Gomez, East Valley Youth Symphony, AZ: “Changing Classroom Management Struggles into Successful Results”; Thursday December 19, 1:00 p.m. Meeting Room W185

Julie Duty, United Sound: “Relationships that Resonate: Creating a Culture of Leadership and Inclusion through United Sound”; Wednesday December 18, 3:00 p.m. Meeting Room W186

Julie Giroux, Clinician/Composer/Conductor: “An Interview with Julie Giroux”; Friday December 20, 10:30 a.m. Ballroom W183

Matt McCready, Union Public Schools, OK: “Teaching through Poverty: Removing Barriers for Participation and Performance”; Thursday December 19, 11:30 a.m. Meeting Room W179

Richard Floyd, UIL Director Emeritus, TX: “Once More with Feeling: The Music Really Matters”; Friday, December 20, 8:30 a.m. Ballroom W183

Richard Saucedo, Carmel H.S., IN retired: Rehearsal Lab – Small School High School Band; Thursday December 19, 4:30 p.m. Ballroom W183

Robert T. Herrings III, Artie Henry Middle School, TX: “Slow and Steady Wins the Race”; Thursday December 19, 3:00 p.m. Meeting Room W181

Mast had been through numerous rounds of buying music equipment for his students at Klein Cain High School and other schools in Houston, Texas: from chairs to stands to storage - and everything in between.

He had always turned to Wenger Corporation, a single-company solution for his music education and performing arts needs.

Klein Cain was no exception. Built in 2017, the school had a variety of equipment requirements for its band, orchestra, and choir rehearsal rooms, main theatre, and black box theatre. Wenger Corporation’s Wenger, J.R. Clancy, and GearBoss brands were the preferred solutions.

“The district saw the advantage of buying quality Wenger products to avoid problems later,” Mast says. “We do it right the first time.”

Quality Investment

In the music education department, Mast and his team selected Wenger’s Student Chairs and Classic 50® Music Stands. Both are durable and the chairs are comfortable and support good posture.

UltraStor® Instrument Cabinets were chosen in the Band and Orchestra rooms to keep the students’ instruments protected, organized and safe when not in use. The bolt-through Wenger design provides increased durability for long-term use.

The StageTek® risers in the rehearsal rooms provide a strong, yet lightweight solution for the band, orchestra, and choirs. The refined, smart design is the product of extensive research, engineering, and technical advancements in materials and manufacturing. The result is a lighter, stronger staging system that’s easier to handle and faster to set up.

Elevated Performance

To enhance the school’s performing arts infrastructure, Wenger designed and manufactured a Diva® Full-Stage Acoustical Shell, enabling them to make acoustic adjustments to best suit each ensemble.

“The Diva shell enables our auditorium’s acoustics to complement and support band, orchestra, and choir, who all require different configurations,” Mast says.

One of the primary benefits in addition to superior sound for the performers and audience is the shell’s versatility. During busy months, it’s often set up or reconfigured every other day. Striking the nine towers and three clouds takes only thirty minutes.

J.R. Clancy provided a full counterweight rigging system in the auditorium. This one-stop solution simplifies coordination for the general contractor and gives the customer a cost-saving package discount. It also means a single point of contact for the school.

Finally, a black box theatre was designed for more intimate performances. Crews included StageTek® risers and chairs for audience seating, which are durable, lightweight, and easy to configure. Move & Store Carts enable the space to be cleared quickly. An adjacent dressing room with Wenger make-up stations and Rack n’ Roll Garment Racks give performers the perfect space to get ready and store costumes or concert wear.

Lighting Integration

In both the auditorium and black box theatre, Wenger Corporation provided lighting integration. Theatrical spotlights, utility lighting, and the integration of emergency lighting with the controls system were an integral part of the auditorium’s hybrid lighting system. In the black box theatre, Wenger implemented power, networking, and controls for a separate hybrid system for ease of use and control.

“We can really shine when a school needs quality equipment in their music education and performing arts spaces,” says Stacy Hanson, Marketing Communications Director at Wenger Corporation. “Our proven solutions offer limitless options, integrated solutions, and outstanding service and support – all of which help students and staff operate efficiently and effectively.”

“Wenger Corporation is always looking forward, listening to customers, and improving their products,” Mast says. “We’re proud to partner with them and include their products in our schools to help our students perform to the best of their abilities.”

To learn more about Wenger Corporation, please visit www.wengercorp.com.

We hope that everyone will be joining us on Thanksgiving Day by watching the 2019 Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade! We cannot wait to watch and support all of the amazing marching bands that will be featured throughout the parade. Some of the nation's finest will come together for the 93rd Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade and we are so excited to see them all in this legendary event.

Make sure you tune in on NBC and join us in supporting these incredible ensembles as they perform for nearly 50 million television viewers nationwide! The parade steps off at 9:00 AM on Thursday, November 28 and will conclude at 12 PM in all time zones.

Below is a list of all of the marching bands you will see in the parade:

Awesome Second Time Arounders Marching Band 
St. Petersburg, FL

Blue Springs H.S. Marching Band
Blue Springs, MO

Catalina Foothills H.S. Marching Band
Tucson, AZ

Franklin Regional H.S. Marching Band
Murrysville, PA

Macy's Great American Marching Band
USA 

Madison Central H.S. Band
Richmond, KY

Martin Luther King Jr. H.S. Marching Band
Lithonia, GA

Morgan State University Marching Band
Baltimore, MD

NYPD Marching Band
New York

Ronald Regan H.S. Marching Band
San Antonio, TX

Western Carolina University Marching Band
Cullowhee, NC

For more information about the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade visit www.macys.com/parade.

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