The Music for All Blog
The Music for All Blog
Tuesday, December 03, 2013

Giving Tuesday

Giving Tuesday

Celebrate #GivingTuesday with Music for All!

Join others from around the world in a day of giving to kick-off the holiday season this year. Retailers have Black Friday and Cyber Monday, and we want you to help us support #GivingTuesday! #GivingTuesday was launched last year as a campaign to create a national day of giving to support charitable activities that support non-profit organizations like Music for All. Whether supporting Music for All with a donation or spreading the word about #GivingTuesday, you can make a difference for nonprofits across the world. Here's how you can make a difference:

 Support Music for All's Summer Symposium Scholarships

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This #GivingTuesday, you can provide positively life-changing experiences to high school students through the Music for All Scholarship Fund. The MFA Summer Symposium is a weeklong summer camp that provides world class music instruction, leadership training, immersive performance opportunities and nightly concerts. Students who attend the Summer Symposium become leaders in their band, school and community and aquire the skills necessary for success beyond high school. Camp scholarships provide valuable opportunties for underserved students and communities with limited access to high qality music and leadership training. By partnering with Music for All as a donor this #GivingTuesday, you are showing that you believe in music education, music in our schools and Music for All. Click here to make your donation today.

Spread the Word about #GivingTuesday

67c91a8d-7977-4b2b-90fe-83889ac564a3Even if you're unable to make a charitable gift today, you can support #GivingTuesday by spreading the word to support charitable activites all day. One unique way to support #GivingTuesday is the #unselfie. Show your support for #GivingTuesday and Music for All by uploading an #unselfie to your Facebook, Twitter or Instagram pages. Encourage your friends and followers to support #GivingTuesday as well. The holiday season is the perfect time to embrace giving, and what better way than with #GivingTuesday. You can visit www.givingtuesday.org for more #GivingTuesday social media resources. Don't forget to check out Music for All's social media pages all day for more #GivingTuesday information.

Published in News

Heartland Film Festival

Heartland Truly Moving Pictures will hold the 22nd Annual Heartland Film Festival on October 17-26 in Indianapolis. The Festival will showcase the very best in inspiring independent film from all over the world with screenings at AMC Showplace Traders Point 12, AMC Castleton Square 14 and the Wheeler Arts Community in Fountain Square.

Like Music for All, Heartland Truly Moving Pictures is an Indianapolis-based nonprofit arts organization. Their mission is to inspire filmmakers and audiences through the transformative power of film. We are excited to participate in the 2013 Heartland Film Festival $2BACK Program, which gives us $2 back for every ticket purchased online! Use the promo code “MUSIC4ALL.” This is an amazing opportunity to support both Heartland Truly Moving Pictures and Music for All!

You can click here to see the full schedule of films in the Heartland Film Festival, including Life Inside Out, a film that uses music to connect a struggling family: When a mother returned to her musical roots, she rediscovers the passion of her youth and finds a way to connect with her troubled teenage son.

If you are looking for something fun and entertaining to do in Indianapolis this month, why not support local arts organizations while enjoying new, award-winning films! When you purchase tickets online, be sure to enter the promo code “MUSIC4ALL” and support Music for All’s “I believe” campaign.

For more information about the Heartland Film Festival, check out their website: www.HeartlandFilmFestival.org;

Facebook: Heartland Truly Moving Pictures on Facebook

Twitter: @heartlandtmp

Published in News
Wednesday, August 14, 2013

It's all about the focus!

 

All of us at Music for All love hearing from students, directors and parents about what is happening in THEIR band and in THEIR communities! Every once in awhile, someone sends us a great message on Facebook, gives us a call, sends a letter, or shares a photo with us, just because. Words cannot express how much we love hearing from all of you who BELIEVE in music education! The following note was shared with us via Facebook this week and we thought we would share it with our extended Music for All family by posting it here on the blog. (With permission as always!)

 

"So excited for the upcoming fall marching season. We attended the BOA Lucas Stadium event last year and I want to compliment the volunteers...they were helpful and courteous. I am hoping my personal work schedule will allow me to volunteer at some point in the future.

I know all schools involved have and continue to work on their programs for 2013...I attached a photo of my son Nik I just took during the summer camp program at Jeffersonville High School, under the direction of Scott Cooksey. I think it is a nice representation of the focus the kids put into their practices. 

Thank you for all your hard work and dedication to music!

Regards, Elke W."

Student photo

 

Yes!- this photo definitely showcases that focus reguired in marching rehearsals! Thank you for sharing this photo and your kind note Elke, it definitely brightened this staff member's day!

Have a story or a photo you want to share with our community of music education advocates? We'd love for you to share! Send us a message on Facebook, or email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.!

 

ErinSignatureinJennaSueFont


Erin Fortune is the Marketing Coordinator focusing on digital marketing at Music for All, and has been working with Music for All for nearly three years, first in the Participant Relations department and now in marketing. She is a graduate from the Music Industry Management program at Ferris State University in Michigan and is a former Percussive Arts Society Intern and a Yamaha Corporation of America, Band and Orchestral Division Intern.

 

Published in Stories
Monday, April 08, 2013

Life is better with music

Today's blog post in support of Arts Advocacy Days is written by Music for All's President and CEO, Eric L. Martin.

Life is better with music! That’s a tagline I borrow with pride from the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, a great institution and strategic partner of Music for All. Advocacy (for the arts and especially arts education) is a pillar of Music for All’s strategic plan and vision to ensure that every child across America has access and opportunity to engage in active music making in his or her scholastic environment.

In March, we celebrated “Music in Our Schools” month with presentation of one of the largest ever Music for All National Festivals that included 2,100 students from across the nation in performances and camaraderie that showcased the best of scholastic music making and the excellence that comes from music and music education in our schools.

Perhaps, legendary drummer, Ndugu Chancler summed it up best in his “rap” with the Jazz Band of America confirming his belief in music, music education and power of jazz with an affirming “uh huh, yeah, that’s right.” 

This month, we are a proud National Co-Sponsor of “Arts Advocacy Day 2013,” supporting and helping to bring our collective voice about the importance of the arts and arts education to our nation’s leadership in Washington.


“Uh huh, yeah, that’s right,” we believe that every child in America is entitled to a quality arts education. A child’s education is simply incomplete unless it includes the arts.

Quality education and the educational preparedness of our children, rightly so, are driving and central issues demanding and deserving attention in our nation. As a people, we are exploring all of the possibilities. Many of the choices being explored are valid, valuable and viable. I work, as do all of us at Music for All, to ensure that whatever our choices, be they CORE, STEM or “all of the above,” include affirmative support and plans that ensure access and quality of opportunity for all children to engage in active music making (and the other arts) in his or her scholastic environment. My own experiences in school environments that appreciated and provided active music making and music education programs made me who I am, and opened and facilitated unique and powerful experiences in and avenues to leadership, teamwork, collaboration and community essential to my development and my performance as a leader. It is for this reason I believe arts education is essential to the development of our youth, and consequently, the character of our nation.

Life (family, community, business, or nation and our world) simply is better with music and the arts... “uh huh, yeah, that’s right.” Who we are as a people and a nation depends on it.

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Read Eric's last blog post on the subject of STEAM titled:  Music (and arts) for All in the 21st Century.

ericEric Martin is President and Chief Executive Officer of Music for All, Inc. He is a Past Chairman of the Board of Directors of the International Festivals and Events Association, of which he is a member of its Hall of Fame. Mr. Martin was previously president of ELM Productions, an Atlanta-based special events production company. He has numerous annual and “once in a lifetime” production credits and was recognized with a regional Emmy Award for his production of the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Holiday Parade on SuperStation TBS. Mr. Martin is a Certified Festivals and Events Executive and an honors graduate of Dartmouth College. He holds a Juris Doctor degree from University of Michigan Law School.

 
 
Published in Advocacy in Action
Tuesday, April 02, 2013

Why do you #BelieveInMusic ?

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Music motivates. Music mesmerizes. Music moves.

We at Music for All believe in music and in music education, which is why we strive to create, provide and expand positively life-changing experiences through music for all. We believe that, apart from the pure beauty of music, it provides benefits to us outwardly and inwardly through personal learning and growth, team building, striving to reach goals and much more.

But we want to know about our followers—why do YOU believe in music?

We invite you to follow the #BelieveInMusic hashtag and join our Twitter campaign to help spread the word about the amazing powers of music. Reply @musicforall with “I #BelieveInMusic because…” to share your thoughts and feelings. Great responses will be retweeted!

Take a look at what people are already tweeting:

“I #BelieveInMusic because it helps me recognize beauty.”

“I #BelieveInMusic because it can teach us what we should know about each other and what we already know about ourselves.”

“I #BelieveInMusic because music is life”

 To learn more about Music for All’s music advocacy program, visit www.musicforall.org/i-believe.

 

Make sure you’re staying connected with us!

“Like” us on Facebook:

www.facebook.com/musicforallnetwork

www.facebook.com/bandsofamerica

www.facebook.com/orchestraamerica

 Follow us on Twitter:

www.twitter.com/musicforall

www.twitter.com/bandsofamerica

Published in Stories

The article below was featured in the Music for All January/February Newsletter. With March being Music in Our Schools month, we thought it would be appropriate to share again here on the blog, enjoy!

Music (and arts) for All in the 21st Century
by Eric L. Martin, President and CEO, Music for All
 

“Humans need to communicate, share, store and create.As a species, we’ve engaged 
in these functions for centuries. There’s really nothing new about them. What is new are the forms, or tools, that students use to meet these needs.”
From 21st Century Skills: Rethinking How Students Learn, by James Bellanca and Ron Brandt (Eds.) (Leading Edge series)
 
SpeakingMusicOver the several months leading up to last November’s elections, I was inundated (as I’m sure you were) with campaign ads touting the virtues (or lack thereof) of candidates of all persuasions and ilk. These ads showcased each candidate’s commitment and ability to address and solve our largest challenges, most important human needs and their ability to perpetuate and allow us to attain the quintessential “American Dream.” Beyond the economy, much emphasis was and still remains placed on maintaining or reclaiming our ability to compete and lead globally. The conversation about our young people was often about the loss of our educational edge. We’re convinced, and maybe rightfully so, that we are failing to educate and prepare our children for the competitive challenges of the 21st century. It’s a valid conversation, however, I feel a responsibility to bring another voice into the discussion.
 
Folks around my office sometimes fondly (or not so fondly) know and label me “a diploma snob.” For some, a diploma snob means where you went to school, but for me, and I own this observation, it’s more about how you’ve been prepared and trained to think and reason. Science, technology, engineering and math, the STEM concepts we hear about so often, have their rightful place and I certainly support moving from STEM to STEAM, infusing and demanding that the arts be inserted and recognized as a core, valid and vital part of the learning and achievement equation. However, my support for STEAM is more deeply rooted in my “snobbery.” 
 
What I care about in every student and every professional I encounter, be it personally or for Music for All, are their “abilities to think and reason.” I look for and build my faith in the future of our children, our nation and our culture on the ability to teach children “how to think and reason,” a very different concept than “what to think.”
 
I am a product of the arts, infused naturally and effectively, in a total education. Engagement in the arts (and other programs of human engagement), coupled with core academic subject matter, gave me the opportunity and platform to help understand and advance human, societal and business relationships. Understanding not just that things work, but how they work, why they work and realizing their impact on ones’ self, and others, form the essence of prepared and effective leadership. In this context, I am a “snob” about preparing our children to thrive effectively in the future.
 
So what does this have to do about the 21st century workforce? For me, its about the 21st century “Life Force.” I’ve traveled across the country speaking to students, teachers, administrators and parents with an “artistic” interest that drives my professional commitment. Almost daily, I struggle to hear effective dialogue and collaboration as our leaders seek to address, solve and resolve some of our most difficult local and global challenges and conflicts. I long for more conversation with the historical, philosophical and “civil” teachings and dialogue about the development of America’s strength and destiny from an ultimate commitment to the common good, general welfare and societal empathy and commitment to the wellbeing and advancement of “the least of those.” I miss experiencing our American commitment to active listening, the common good and the art of compromise. Too often, the dialogue (or absence thereof) is centered on winners and losers, my way or the highway, and to the winner goes the earned and rightful spoils. 
 
I often ask what our student performing arts ensembles would be and sound like if they did not learn skills about individual and ensemble commitment to concepts like intonation, leading and following, collaboration and exchange of thoughts and ideas, or if they refused to accept and see the benefits of leadership. I can only imagine the unintended discordant result of an ensemble whose idea of excellence is “every man or woman out for himself or herself.”
 
Great ensembles know, and are taught, that great results only come from collective achievement. The whole is only as successful as the individual parts comprising it. Performance responsibility of each individual is necessary for ensemble success. In other words, all members of the ensemble have a vested interest in the skill development, well-being and achievement of others. “We’re in it together,” is a vital and essential factor and tool for success. We become great when each and every member not only understands “the what” and “the how”, but also “the why.” It is then that they can lead themselves with effective decision-making and collaboration for the “common good.” If only all of our leaders, including government leaders, shared that common understanding. In the end the “audience,” like our world, benefits.
 
“The combination of core academic subjects, 21st century themes and 21st century skills redefines rigor for our times. However, rigor traditionally is equated with mastery of content (core subjects) alone, and that’s simply not good enough anymore.”
 
“Growing proportions of the nation’s labor force are engaged in jobs that emphasize expert thinking or complex communication- tasks that computers cannot do.”
 
“The assessment is forward looking, focusing on young people’s ability to use their knowledge and skills to meet real life challenges, rather than merely on the extent to which they have mastered a 
specific school curriculum.”
From 21st Century Skills: Rethinking How Students Learn 
 
Harvard Professor, Shelley Carson, wrote the following for the Huffington Post after a 2010 G-20 Summit meeting: “The G-20 Summit in Toronto is now over and, not surprisingly, one of the conclusions of the conference was that in order to attract investors, nations need to provide an ’environment that promotes creativity.’ From politics to business to education to sports, creativity is one of the buzzwords of this decade. We used to think of creativity as the province of artists, musicians and writers. Now we’re waking up to the fact that all facets of modern life demand creative input.1”
 
Most social and educational scientists agree that creativity is a necessary core “skill.” Creativity is an essential tool for 21st century success. And the beauty of our opportunities is that the human brain is built for creativity. Our responsibility as practitioners and promoters of music education is to ensure that our children have access, opportunity and skills necessary to discover and activate their God given and innate abilities. Our individual, organizational and human success depends on it. In short, Dr. Carson summarizes that, “creativity is important for artists, writers, musicians and inventors; but it is also crucial for societies, businesses and individuals who need to juggle fulfillment with the demands of the rapid-change culture. You not only need to be creative to enhance your life, you need it to survive.”
 
Our society is replete with evidence of success authored by artistically inspired achievers. A 2009 Harris Interactive poll shows that three-quarters of Fortune 100 executives were involved in some type of music program while in school and research shows that the longer executives participated, the more successful they became in life.
 
“The skills that they are learning, the things that they’re doing as a part of their music program, and their leadership experiences … these are the things that I look for when I’m hiring people. When I see on the resume that there is some type of artistic activity and leadership experience, I know that is someone I’m interested in interviewing. It’s the skills that aren’t taught anywhere else that make that person stand out above the rest.”  – Christian Howes, San Francisco Bay Area based Computer Software Designer/Engineer
 
I am fortunate to live in a state and a community that truly embraces the importance of arts, arts education and a strong artistic environment. Music for All’s corporate presence in Indianapolis, IN is no accident. Instead, our presence is part of our community’s plan to embrace, encourage and build a holistic support of the arts into its community growth strategies and initiatives. In a community that, for the most part, has no grand natural attraction or calling, like mountains, oceans or lakes, Indianapolis has created its own enticements and incentives for the arts. The city’s commitment to the arts is the reason that Music for All, Drum Corps International, the Percussive Arts Society, the International Violin competition, the American Pianists Association and the Heartland Truly Moving Pictures International Film Festival call Indianapolis home. 
 
It is no accident that Indiana is a state where one of its (and America’s) largest privately held corporations is led by the corporation founder’s son’s middle school band director. Entrepreneurs clearly recognize and are attracted to talent that includes evidence of creativity, creative instinct and problem solving in their repertoire. It is further no accident that Music for All is blessed to be governed by leaders who themselves (or their children) are products and beneficiaries of quality music education. They are entrepreneurs, corporate executives, lawyers, accountants and community leaders who see and are passionately committed to music and arts education.
 
The arts, and particularly ensemble experiences in the arts, have always provided an edge for development and appreciation of creativity, in an environment defined by collaboration, group and individual problem solving, mutual respect and cooperation. If it is true that success and a successful workforce in the 21st century require critical thinking, creative problem solving, innovation, effective communication and team work, then every American child’s scholastic day should include an active “hands-on” experience in the band, orchestra, dance, theatre, art and/or choir room. The collaboration necessary for success (student to student, student to teacher, student to parent, parent to teacher and everyone to their community – the audience and beneficiary) is inherent in the process. The goal is 
not professional artistry. They all will not become Christopher Martin (Principal Trumpet of the Chicago Symphony), renowned actress Jennifer Morrison or even Carl Cook or Kem Hawkins (CEO and President, respectively, of the Indiana-based Cook Group), but they will be better prepared and more able to compete and contribute meaningfully in the 21st century. 
 
The discussion about 21st century skills and creativity as a necessary and essential component is not new, nor is it likely to go away, at least not before we begin to look to the needs of the 22nd century. One need only look to Time’s 2005 article on the subject, still valid and valuable in 2012. At Music for All, we are committed to being a catalyst to ensure that every child across America has access and opportunity to participate in active music making in his or her scholastic environment. Our name and mission require no less of us. We believe in music education, music in our schools and Music for All.
 
1 “Creativity in the 21st Century” Huffington Post Article By Shelley Carson, Ph.D.
Research psychologist; lecturer, Harvard University, following the 2010 Toronto G20 Summit
 
 
ericEric Martin is President and Chief Executive Officer of Music for All, Inc. He is a Past Chairman of the Board of Directors of the International Festivals and Events Association, of which he is a member of its Hall of Fame. Mr. Martin was previously president of ELM Productions, an Atlanta-based special events production company. He has numerous annual and “once in a lifetime” production credits and was recognized with a regional Emmy Award for his production of the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Holiday Parade on SuperStation TBS. Mr. Martin is a Certified Festivals and Events Executive and an honors graduate of Dartmouth College. 
He holds a Juris Doctor degree from University of Michigan Law School.

 

Published in Advocacy in Action
Thursday, December 13, 2012

Power2Give

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In partnership with the Arts Council of Indianapolis, Music for All is proud to launch two projects on the new power2give site. The power2give site is an online cultural marketplace designed to connect donors with projects for which they are passionate. Music for All will utilize power2give to offer our supporters opportunities to make direct impact on our world-class programming.


Music for All currently has two projects posted on power2give.org that supporters can donate to:“Oh, The Places You’ll Go!”-IPS Rose Parade Sponsorship, which is an opportunity to send an Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS) student to Los Angeles to participate in the BOA Honor Band in the 2013 Rose Parade®; and “Music Matters: Support Music in our Schools,” a project to develop an advocacy and awareness campaign through PSAs that promote the importance of music education in our schools.  You can view information and help fund these projects at: http://www.power2give.org/go/o/552.

Chase Bank will be donating $0.50 for every $1.00 donated to the, “Oh, The Places You’ll Go!”-IPS Rose Parade Sponsorship. Music for All would like to thank Chase Bank for its support of the arts in our community.

 We hope you join us in showing your support for music and arts education by sharing these projects with fellow supporters of the arts via email and social media. If you have questions about the projects, please feel free to contact Music for All at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  or 317-636-2263. 

 
FAQs

How does it work?
Music for All and other 501(c)(3) organizations in Central Indiana will submit projects in need of funding to the power2give website. After approval from the Arts Council of Indianapolis, the project will be posted to the website for up to 90 days, where you can select an amount to donate toward the project. The minimum donation is just $1. For every dollar raised, 12 cents goes to cover administrative costs and credit card fees.

What happens if the project I donate to isn’t fully funded?
If you give to a Music for All project that isn’t fully funded, a representative of our Development Department will contact you to notify you how the project will be adapted to utilize your generous gift.

What are the donor benefits?
Music for All has developed incentives for donors to ensure that they are closely connected to the project.  After the project is funded or has expired, Music for All will distribute the donor benefits listed on the power2give give project page.
 
Is my gift tax deductible?
Yes, because power2give is a program of the Arts Council of Indianapolis, a 501(c)(3) organization and the donor benefits listed do not have tax implications, your gift is fully tax deductible.

What are ways I can get involved with a project aside from donating?
You can help promote projects through email and social media outlets like Facebook and Twitter. For information on volunteering for Music for All, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

For more information on power2give, please visit www.indyarts.org/power2give.

Published in News
Tuesday, October 02, 2012

Trivia Tuesdays

Trivia

Trivia Tuesday!

To celebrate the rest of the 2012 BOA season we want to try something fun with all of our fans on Facebook, so every Tuesday until Grand Nationals week we are going to have BOA Trivia for prizes!


It's a simple game, but just to keep everyone on the same page, here are the guidelines for how this will work each week.

  • There will be a trivia question every Tuesday until the week of Grand Nationals.
  • It may not be at the same time every Tuesday.
  • A few hours before we post the trivia question we will post a reminder about the game, and an approximate time that the question will be posted on Facebook.
  • We will ask ONE trivia question each Tuesday, the first correct response will receive the prize for that day.
  • You may win only ONE TIME during Trivia Tuesdays for the 2012 Fall season
  • Final decisions/ disputes about the accuracy of a "correct response" will be determined by Music for All officials

If you have any great BOA trivia that you want to share, we would love to hear it! You can send those to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and you just might see your question used this season!

We hope that you enjoy Trivia Tuesdays and good luck!

Don't forget to Like us on Facebook to be able to see the Trivia questions.

http://www.facebook.com/bandsofamerica
Published in News
Web Leaderboard

Heartland Truly Moving Pictures
will hold the 21st Annual Heartland Film Festival on October 19-27 in Indianapolis, Indiana.
The festival showcases inspiring independent films from all over the world and will hold screenings this year at AMC Showplace Traders Point 12 and AMC Castleton Square 14.

The Heartland Film Festival is a fellow nonprofit arts organization. Their mission is to inspire filmmakers and audiences through the transformative power of film. We are excited to participate in the 2012 Heartland Film Festival $2BACK Program, which gives us $2 back for every ticket purchased online! Use the promo code Music4All. This is an amazing opportunity to support both Heartland Truly Moving Pictures and Music for All!

To top it off one of the films that is showcased during this festival is "Stronger," a story of an extraordinarily talented violinist deals with the problem of bullying at school, featuring our friends Time for Three! For any of our students who were at Summer Symposium this past year, the "Stronger" is what played at the beginning of the evening Time for Three concert! Any students who were a part of the Orchestra track at Symposium would also have fond memories of performing with Time for Three! You can see clips of that here and relieve the memories!

We definitly want to get as many people out to see and support Time for Three's film, it has such a powerful message! You can find more information about the film and show times here:

http://www.ticketinguide.com/Heartland2012/Stronger.html

Also, check out Time for Three on Facebook and Twitter if you get a chance!


So if you are looking for something fun to do in Indianapolis and want to get out and support the arts, we definitely recommend you check out Stronger, or any of the other films this festival has to offer!

And if you decide to purchase a ticket, why not use our promo code and help support Music for All's "I believe" campaign.

Just use the promo code: Music4All when purchasing your tickets online!

For more information about the Heartland Film Festival, check out their website . www.HeartlandFilmFestival.org or

Facebook: Heartland Truly Moving Pictures on Facebook

Twitter: @heartlandtmp

 
Published in News
Thursday, September 13, 2012

I Believe- A Day at the Penrod Art Fair

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Music for All staff were lucky enough to get the chance to exhibit at the Penrod Art Fair in Indianapolis this past weekend.

Penrod is an art fair who’s mission focuses on the cultivation, encouragement and development of public interest in and support of those arts, cultural and educational institutions located in and around Marion County, Indiana, its surrounding counties and the Central Indiana area in general.

We at Music for All love to see our community engaging and supporting public interest in the arts, so naturally this was a perfect fit for us! We joined over three hundred artists, six stages of entertainment and more than 50 arts-related non-profit organizations for what’s known as “Indiana’s Nicest Day.”

And what a gorgeous day it was!

Not only was the weather pretty much perfect, but everyone who stopped by to talk to us during the fair was incredible and had wonderful stories to share about their love of music.

For this particular exhibit our Development department wanted to do something extra special. They decided to create a fun and engaging activity that goes along with our “I Believe” campaign (if you are not familiar with the campaign, you should check it out here).

They created a tri-fold poster board with the heading “Tell us why you believe” and three panels that said: in music, in music in our schools, in Music for All.

The responses to the prompt were incredible. As someone who walked up to the booth toward the end of the day, I can tell you that the board had an incredible impact filled with the post-it note responses!

Here are some of the things that people wrote on the post-its.

In music in our schools:
  • Because music helps us learn to express ourselves
  • Because it installs creativity in students
  • Because it improves test scores!
  • Music in our schools is a safe haven for students to express themselves. It's crucial that all students have access to ALL music
  • Music makes kids smarter
  • It teaches students to work together toward a common goal
In music:
  • Music makes you smarter
  • Music moves you mind, body & soul
  • Music is always there for you
  • Music speaks across the universe
  • Because it is the window to the soul
  • Music takes you away (amen added by another!)
  • Expression and inspiration
  • It's my livelihood
  • Kids need exposure and education beyond the core subjects
  • It transformed my life
  • Because it heals the soul
  • It changes lives
  • It is essentially inexplicable
  • When words fail, music speaks
  • Music goes beyond facts and logic to the sublime!
  • So much expression- so much hope!
  • Music connects to everyone
  • Because music is my life
In Music for All
  • Every kid should be able to have good things about them and that means trying new things.
  • To find it!
  • Because music opens door of your soul to soar
  • Because helps the soul
  • Sounds are good
  • Because music is truly the universal language
  • Because music is for everyone
  • Music is reflection of the soul
  • Because it changes lives
  • Music is an art that you listen to and connect to
  • Music education develops the WHOLE person
  • Because music gives people a place to belong

 

I believe Poster

Penrod was on Saturday and I can tell you that I haven’t stopped thinking about these responses. I find it reassuring that there are so many people out there (and in my community!) that feel the same way about music as I do. I know that there are people across the country that feel this way as well.

Reading all of the responses encouraged me to come up with my own responses for why “I believe.”

So why do I believe?

  • I believe in music because music enriches my life and the lives of others.
  • I believe in music education because EVERY child deserves to be touched by music.
  • And I believe in Music for All because I believe in the power of music and the power of the positively life-changing experiences that Music for All brings to students across our country.

So today as you take a break from work, from school, from rehearsal, your busy life in general, read through the repsonses again on why people at the Penrod Art Fair in Indianapolis, Indiana believe.

And then? Tell me why you believe.

 
ErinSignatureinJennaSueFont

 



Erin Fortune
Marketing Coordinator
Music for All

Published in News
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