Fanfare: The Week in Music Education - May 5
Monday, May 05, 2014

Fanfare: The Week in Music Education - May 5

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"Fanfare: The Week in Music Education" is a weekly collection of news and stories about the latest in music education and music advocacy. Get your week started right with the latest news in music education, as well as timely music advocacy resources so that you may promote music education in your community. If you would like to share a story or announcement in "Fanfare," feel free to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., and it could be featured in an upcoming post.


HappyHappy-2 Teacher Appreciation Week!

This week is Teacher Appreciation Week across the country! Since 1984, National PTA® has designated the first week of May as Teacher Appreciation Week. As classes wind down for the spring, be sure to thank your current and former teachers for their service. Whether the extreme amounts of time spent in the music room or the valuable life skills that music can help develop, music teachers topped my list of favorite teachers while in school like many others involved in school music. Throughout the week, Music for All will be sharing stories of impactful music teachers, and we'd love to hear from you! Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to participate and share your story.

Arizona educator imagines "Every Student Making Music!"

Our vision at Music for All places an emphasis on providing scholastic music education to every child across America, so its no surprise we found this National Association for Music Education article from Arizona music educator Ruth Argabright moving. Ms. Argabright, District Music Education Coordinator at Mesa Public Schools, imagines a public school system where all upper elementary students receive instrumental and vocal music education during the school day. Under Argabright's plan, the pull-out system would no longer be necessary, and all students would have access to quality music education. Argabright says, "The young people in our schools today will soon take our places in the work force and community. They should be provided with as many opportunities during their developmental years to help ensure that they become outstanding, productive citizens."

"With Music, the Sky Is Not the Limit, It's Just the View"

Just in the short history of "Fanfare," we have shared many moving commentaries on the impact of music and music education. While they collectively show the vast power of music, each also provides a slightly different angle that may change the view of a "non-believer." This Huffington Post commentary from Music Unites founder Michelle Edgar moved me, especially the story of Kwasi Enin, the New York student accepted to all eight Ivy League colleges. "I directly developed my capacity to think creatively around problems due to the infinite possibilities in music," said Enin, who studied viola, in an admissions essay. Enin will be attending Yale in the fall and plans to study medicine.

STEM to STEAM: Rep. Suzanne Bonamici (OR) advocates for arts education

While in Washington, DC for Arts Advocacy Day, I had the opportunity to hear from U.S. Representative Suzanne Bonamici, who is head of the Congressional STEAM Caucus and a fervent advocate for including the arts as a core component of education. Last week, Rep. Bonamici questioned Education Secretary Arne Duncan on arts education funding during a committee hearing. By consolidating several Department of Education programs, Rep. Bonamici spoke to ensure that funds would be available for arts programming through STEM funding. Rep. Bonamici is a wonderful advocate for arts education in the House and helped found the Congressional STEAM Caucus last year. You can watch a clip of the committee hearing below:

 

Broken Arrow High School students perform at Carnegie Hall

Performing at Carnegie Hall is quite an honor, especially for high school students. Not only did nearly 200 students from the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Department perform on one of America's most famous stages, but they also were led by legendary Broken Arrow alum Kristin Chenoweth in a rousing performance of the title song from "Oklahoma!." Local CBS affiliate provided in-depth coverage on the trip to New York, which even featured a slight hiccup: damaged and destroyed instruments from a car accident. Thanks to a Florida high school band and a music store that opened on Easter Sunday, the group was able to replace damaged instruments in time for the concert. Congratulations to Broken Arrow, and thank you to KOTV for some excellent music education news coverage! You can watch the feature below.

  NewsOn6.com - Tulsa, OK - News, Weather, Video and Sports - KOTV.com |

Read 2501 times Last modified on Monday, May 05, 2014
Seth Williams

Seth Williams is the Advocacy Coordinator at Music for All. Seth is no stranger to Music for All and Bands of America – first as a participant and as an intern in Development and Participant Relations. He is a graduate of the Butler University Jordan College of the Arts and previously worked in the Broadway theatre industry in New York. A proud alumnus of “The Centerville Jazz Band,” Seth is likely the biggest band nerd he knows.

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