The Music for All Blog
The Music for All Blog
Erin Fortune
Erin Fortune is the Marketing Manager focusing on digital marketing at Music for All and has been working with Music for All since 2010, first in the Participant Relations department and now in marketing. She is a graduate of the Music Industry Management program at Ferris State University in Michigan and is a former Percussive Arts Society Intern and a Yamaha Corporation of America, Band and Orchestral Division Intern.
Thursday, June 13, 2013

Directors' Academy: It's worth it!

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As an avid fan of the Music for All blog, (we know everyone currently reading is a subscriber. No? Well what are you waiting for?) you probably know all about the Directors’ Academy and what is has to offer.

But JUST in case you don’t know about the sessions offered at Summer Symposium FOR DIRECTORS- I’m going to tell you about it. (And even if you think you know, humor me and read this post? It helps my self-esteem when my work gets read; my ego thanks you in advance.)

First of all, the Summer Symposium really is an amazing opportunity. It brings you the absolute best to provide a comprehensive experience. It truly is a TOTAL experience, with something for every band director: high school and middle school, from the most experienced to the younger teacher at the start of his or her career. Music for All offers tools that will allow you to achieve peak performance for your ensembles and yourself. The Symposium is the place to get a head start on next year’s thinking. It’s a place to make connections, get new ideas and learn new strategies.

At the Music for All Summer Symposium Directors’ Academy, you get: SAM 9730
• Control of your own experience
• The Cavaliers in Residence
• Peer-to-Peer Networking
• Professional Development
• Dream Team Faculty
• Great Facilities
• One-on-one directors’ lounge: personal consultation with the masters
• Universal Pedagogy for Schools Small and Large, Suburban, Rural and Urban
• Nightly concerts
• An opportunity to play in the Directors’ Band
• And everyone’s favorite part: Director Socials in the evening!


Now I realize that everything I just told you is a very general overview and you are probably still reading this and thinking, “But WHAT will I really be learning in sessions at camp? Is it worth it?”

Well, I can tell you that we have directors from all different backgrounds and school sizes who come back to camp year after year. And if those directors were sitting across from you today they would all absolutely tell you it’s worth it.

But don’t take it from me- hear it from those directors themselves!

 

We know sometimes it’s hard to make a case for attending a workshop/convention/camp without first knowing exactly what sessions will be available. Maybe you are looking to brush up on new technology, talk with someone about your marching band show design, or just looking for a chance to play your instrument and hear new music coming out in the next year. Well, we understand that completely! Here's the full, tentative schedule of sessions for the 2013 Directors' Academy!

So check out what sessions will be offered- there’s bound to be several that interest you!

You can also watch a collection of featured Directors’ sessions on the MusicforAlltv YouTube channel: 

SAM 9726

 

 
 
 
 

 

Don’t forget- if you are a Color Guard or Percussion Instructor, there are specialized tracks within the Directors’ Academy for you!

Read more about the Percussion Specialist Academy

Read more about the Color Guard Instructor Academy

 

So make sure you register today and I'll see you in Muncie in just a few weeks. Make sure you stop by headquarters and say hi and tell me about your camp experience!

 

Musically,

 ErinSignatureinJennaSueFont

Erin Fortune is the Marketing Coordinator at Music for All, and has been working with Music for All for nearly three years, first in the Participant Relations department and now in marketing. She is a graduate from the Music Industry Management program at Ferris State University in Michigan and is a former Percussive Arts Society Intern and a Yamaha Corporation of America, Band and Orchestral Division Intern.

 

If you are a band director, orchestra director or percussion ensemble director who is considering applying for the 2014 Music for All National Festival, presented by Yamaha, don't forget that applications and audition recordings must be received by June 5, 2013.

We hope by now you know everything you need to know about why you should apply to be a part of the Music for All National Festival, but if you don't, here are some highlights to consider:
 
What IS the Music for All National Festival?
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The MFA National Festival is an invigorating gathering of outstanding high school and middle school concert bands, orchestras and percussion ensembles from across America. Once invited, by recorded audition, the "competition" is completed – the Festival itself is non-competitive, with no rankings or ratings. Instead, the focus is on performing for peers and for the evaluator panel of esteemed conductors and clinicians.
 
What are the Highlights of the Music for All National Festival?
  • Recorded and Written evaluation: All who apply receive recorded and written evaluation from the listening panel, making the audition process itself an educational resource.

  • A national stage: High School and Middle Schools concert bands, orchestras and percussion ensembles from all over the country are invited to apply to be a part of the Festival.

  • Expanded opportunities for concert bands: The National Concert Band Festival will now include two stages (opportunities) for high school bands- "Featured Bands"" on the Honors Stage at Clowes and "Invited Bands" on the Festival Stage at the new Howard L. Schrott Center for the Performing Arts, both at Butler University. Read more about these NEW exciting opportunities here.
  • A non-competitive experience: without the worry of ratings or rankings, directors are free to explore and stretch themselves, and students can enjoy music-making without the pressure of competition.

  • Concert Performances and Clinics: Each ensemble performs a concert before a knowledgable audience, including the Festival evaluation panel, music educators and fellow band and orchestra members. Ensemble directors will receive recorded and written comments from evaluators and input on their conducting as well. Following the peformance, each ensemble will have a clinic providing even more educational opportunties.

  • Master Classes: All students participate in instrumental master classes, led by top applied faculty and professional musicians. 

  • Social Events for Students and Directors: The Festival social gives students the chance to relax, have fun and get to know students from other programs across the country. The director and evaluator reception and hospitality opportunities offer networking and informal interaction with colleagues, guest artists and icons of music education.

  • Gala Awards Banquet: The "black-tie-optional" banquet for students, directors, parents, staff and evaluators culminates the Festival with first-class standards that distinguish the Music for All National Festival. The formal banquet with over 2,000 guests is sure to be unforgettable for you, your students, parents and supporters.

  • Clowes-StageWorld-Class Venues and Facilities: Featured Bands perform at Clowes Memorial Hall and Invited Bands at the new Howard L. Schrott Center for the Performing Arts, both on the Butler University campus. Percussion ensembles perform at Warren Performing Arts Center and Orchestras at Hilbert Circle Theatre, home of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra.
  • DVD & CD Package: Each student member and director gets a recording package of their concert, including professionaly-produced video on DVD and audio on CD.

  • Ensemble Hosts: Each invited ensemble will be assigned a "host" to help guide you through the Festival weekend and is committed to ensuring that you have the best possible experience before and during the Festival. Hosts are familiar with, and in most cases have had an ensemble perform at, the Festival.

  • Opportunities for Additional Ensembles: Many groups want to travel with all of the students in their school's band program and Music for All provides educational options to allow as many of your instrumental music students as possible to participate. Directors can choose to submit audition applications for multiple bands from one school for the Featured Band and/or Invited Band stages. Selected bands from both stages can choose to bring additional ensembles- concert bands, percussion ensembles, or orchestras- to participate in additional opportunities during the Festival.

 
Do you still feel like you don't have a complete picture of the Music for All National Festival? Watch the video below and hear from the directors and students from Vero Beach H.S. in Vero Beach, Flordia as they experienced the Music for All National Festival for the first time!
 
Don't miss this opportunity! The 2014 Festival will take place March 6-8 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Send your ensemble audition materials now!
 
 
 
Today's guest post is from Michael J. West who will be on the Bands of America Drum Major Institute faculty at the Music for All Summer Symposium presented by Yamaha. Thanks for giving us a look at what you will be teaching at camp this June, Michael!  
 
 
This summer, I will be joining the staff at the Bands of America Drum Major Institute to teach mace technique. I recently graduated from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign with a master's degree in music education and have been spinning mace for the past nine years. I was a drum major at Carl Sandburg H.S., IL for two years and a drum major for the Marching Illini at the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana for two years. 
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Because of tradition with the Marching Illini Drum Majors, I spent a great deal of time with my mace during those two years. The Marching Illini pregame show, a traditional "Big Ten Conference" production, has been the same since the 1970's. Serving as a central role to that legacy and being able to spin the mace routines that have been passed down to only a few select people each year was a great honor and a wonderful memory. Performing for tens of thousands of fans at Memorial Stadium every fall was a thrill like no other. 
 
MaceVarietyShowBeing able to collaborate with colleagues skilled in this area has been a great deal of fun as well. I have been able to work with a lot of gifted people including past Illini drum majors and other talented individuals from other universities. One of the most fulfilling mace experiences I have had is taking the mace off the field and onto the stage. This past fall I programed and produced a variety show of sorts, which included performing a mace routine to spliced music. It allowed me to explore the more creative side of the mace. Performing this choreography was one of the more expressive opportunities I had. 
 
At the Bands of America Drum Major Institute, I want to teach and refine the basic mace fundamentals. However, we will not limit ourselves to just the basics. It is important that those fundamentals are strong, but I also believe in giving students the tools to create something on their own. I want them to take those ideas, return home, and turn it into something that matches the values of their music program and their individual style. 
 
Looking foward to seeing everyone this summer!
 
-Mike West
 
 
Michael J. West
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign 
Former Drum Major Marching Illini
 
 
Have you enrolled in the Bands of America Drum Major Institute yet? Don't wait any longer, enroll today!
Need more reasons to enroll? Check out the amazing BOA Drum Major Institute faculty, camp videos on YouTube, read Student Testimonials, and check out the Symposium coverage from 2012!
 
 

To celebrate the end of the 2012-13 school year and look forward toward next fall's marching band season, Music for All is making the entire Finals performance of the Carmel High School Marching Greyhounds, Carmel, Indiana, the 2012 Bands of America Grand National Champions, available for viewing FREE online through the end of June 2013.

You can watch that performance right here:

 

There are many more great full-length performances from the 2012 Bands of America Championships available for your viewing pleasure with a subscription to MFA Video. There are several different subscription plans to choose from to fit your needs!

Choose from:

Live Premium- one-year subscription that includes all Live Webcasts that will happen in the next year (including Grand Nationals 2013!) as well as all On-Demand, post-event video. (includes everything listed in MFA Encore subscription below)

MFA Encore- one-year subscription that includes all On-Demand, post-event video. MFA Encore allows you to view our entire archive of events at your convenience. See all Bands of America Championship shows, prelims and exhibitions since 2008, all Super Regional Final and Grand National Final performances since 2004 and other selected performances dating back to 1979. See all Music for All National Festival Performances from 2012 and 2013 (post-event).

Subscribe to MFA Video TODAY to watch all of the 2012 BOA performances online. The subscription if active for an entire year, so subscribing today will get you ready by reviewing the past year's championships as well as take you through the whole upcoming 2013 fall season!

Check out more details about subscribing to MFA Video here: http://www.musicforall.org/video/subscriptions

 

Thursday, May 09, 2013

Teacher Appreciation

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While I hope most teachers feel appreciated every day of the year, there’s nothing like a “holiday” to make us really think about why we appreciate someone. With this week being Teacher Appreciation Week I have been doing a lot of thinking about teachers in my life who have given so selflessly to their profession and have had a true passion for educating their students. I have been blessed with having so many remarkable teachers and mentors throughout my life. Grade school through college there have been several teachers who left their mark, but the one who I really want to thank today is my music teacher.

I went to a fairly small school, where my music teacher was with me from Kindergarten until I graduated High School. Thirteen years certainly helped grow a relationship with my teacher, Ms. O’Neil, but even if she had only been my teacher for one year I know she would have made an impact. Through the help of my music teacher, I realized my passion for music at a very young age. Her enthusiasm for music, and her confidence in me as a performer really shaped the way I viewed myself as a child. Throughout school I ALWAYS had a place where I felt I belonged and that was in music class, and then once I hit Junior High, in the choir room.

Ms. O'Neil gave (and is still giving at Yale Public Schools in Yale, Michigan) so tiresly to her students. I will never forget each year hearing about the choir seniors graduating and Ms. O'Neil sharing a beautiful inspiring story with that particular class and giving them a pearl and telling them how unique and special they were. Every year I watched that beautiful end of the year "ceremony" and I couldn't wait until I was a senior. And then that moment came.. and I was sitting in first hour choir, in a circle of the other Senior choir students and Ms. O'Neil and she told the story yet again that was so familiar to me.

It was the story about the man walking along the sand, and trying so hard to throw each starfish he came across that had washed up to the shore back into the ocean. Another man walks up to him and says, what are you doing? There are so many and you can't possibly throw each one back in, you will never make a difference. But the man keeps going, and throws yet another starfish back in and says "it made a difference to that one."

That story that Ms. O'Neil told every year really epitomises to me what she was always all about...and what so many teachers live for. She worked so hard all of the time, because she knew, even if it was just one student at a time...she could make a difference.

Well, I'm fairly certain that Ms. O'Neil has made a difference in so many lives of the students she has taught..not only teaching them about music, but helping each one of us to be a better person. I know I AM a better person from having known her. Ms. O'Neil if you are reading this, I still have and cherish that pearl you gave me on my last day in your class, and the last time I was home, I saw that my brother, who had graduated four years before me, still had his. Thank you for inspiring my passion for music...and for teaching me that I can make a difference, and even if it's just one starfish... I made a difference for that one.

Yesterday when I was thinking about writing this blog and sharing MY story about the special teacher in my life, I knew that there had to be others in the Music for All office who also had stories of teachers who inspired them. I was so happy to read about so many more amazing stories about inspiring teachers that I just had to share those as well.

TeacherAppreWeekWEDNESDAY 1“Mr. Philip Shepherd was my high school band director (1977-81). I went to an average sized high school (about 1,000 9-12, I think), in a smallish town (about 7,000) in Eastern Kentucky. What is amazing to me looking back is that he instilled in us not just a belief that we could accomplish anything but a real sense of connection at the deepest level to the music and to the highest level of music-making. He had high expectations and it never occurred to us that we weren't going to meet those expectations. I follow the careers of my fellow band mates from that time and see that they are contributing at the highest levels in their chosen professions and I have no doubt that part of that is due to having the privilege of being a student of Mr. Shepherd.”
- Debbie Laferty-Asbill, Vice President of Marketing and Communications


"Though I have had the pleasure of learning from and working with many remarkable educators in my lifetime, I'd specifically like to celebrate my high school band directors, Mr. Charles M. Smith and Dr. Terry Magee.  They are both selfless advocates of music education in our schools and deserve consistent recognition for their commitment to excellence. The time I spent as a student at Lafayette H.S. in Lexington, KY under their direction had a huge impact on who I am as a leader and professional today. I know that I am not the first or last person to acknowledge their efforts and want to personally thank them for being such valuable assets to the 'Pride of the Bluegrass!'"
- Molly Miller, Event Coordinator


"Even after many years of education and hundreds of teachers, the most impactful remains my elementary music teacher, Mrs. Mason. After looking forward to music class each week in third grade, I was entranced by Mrs. Mason’s piano playing and begged my parents to buy a piano. Mrs. Mason’s passion for music was contagious, and after starting lessons, I was hooked. Her compassion for students and high standards of success both propelled my interest in music and improved my work ethic in subjects beyond music. After succumbing to cancer while I was in high school, her legacy of inspiring young students through music for over 40 years solidified my belief in music education and music in our schools. Because music remains a cornerstone of who I am, Mrs. Mason’s legacy lives on."
- Seth Williams, Development Coordinator


TeacherAppreWeekTHURSDAY“I am blessed to have crossed paths with a number of amazing, inspiring educators, from a cross country coach who kindled my love for my sport and a physics teacher whose “Socratic Method” of teaching helped me discover how much of an investigative thinker I am at heart, to a college professor who taught me as much about broadcast media as he did about persevering through life’s challenges through faith. It certainly takes a special kind of heart to fill the role of a teacher, and I feel so thankful for all the people in our nation who double as amazing educators and amazing human beings.

Undoubtedly, I wouldn’t be the same person I am today if it wasn’t for a certain color guard instructor of mine. When I met him, I felt like a very little person trying to break into the very big world of drum corps. Under his leadership, I learned how to focus my energy, refine my skills, and after five spectacular seasons have blossomed into an extremely confident performer and person. What impacted me the most is that he continually challenged me to challenge myself, showing he was confident in me and my talents and never letting me think otherwise. It really is true that when you hold someone to higher standards, they WILL go beyond their original expectations of themselves to achieve them. A heartfelt thanks to Ryan Miller, as well as to all our other teachers who set out on a daily basis to change the lives of students!“
- Carolyn Tobin, Marketing Intern

"Thank you Frank Herzog! My 8th grade history teacher who inspired and rewarded intellectual curiosity. The quote posted on our classroom wall: "in this room, ignorance is not bliss" "
- Nancy Carlson, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

For every story of an inspiring teacher we have here in the Music for All office, we know there are millions more out there in the world. So share it with us. Çomment with a story here on this post. Tell us about it on Facebook or Twitter. Send that amazing teacher a note, to tell them just how much they meant to you. Spend a few minutes thinking about what an incredible job they did. Just celebrate these wonderful teachers in some way.

To all of the teachers who personally touched MY life. Thank you.

To all of the teachers who touched the lives of my coworkers and made them the extraordinary people they are today. Thank you.

To all of the very special band and orchestra directors I have had the pleasure of getting to know through my work at Music for All. Thank you.

To all of the music teachers of all of the students our organization has ever touched. Thank you.

And to all teachers out there in the world, the ones I know and the ones I don’t have the pleasure of knowing: Music, Math, Science, English, History, Art, Health, Physical Education, Technology…  no matter what you teach, you are appreciated. Thank you for sharing your passion and for being there each day for your students.

Thank you, from the bottoms of our hearts, for giving all that you can to your students, for working late, for spending your extra money on something for your classroom because your school budget doesn’t cover it, for being someone your students can talk to, rely on and learn from. You really do make a difference. You really do shape and mold young people to be the best they can possibly be.

Happy Teacher Appreciation Week.

 

Musically,

 

ErinSignatureinJennaSueFont

Erin Fortune is the Marketing Coordinator at Music for All, and has been working with Music for All for nearly three years, first in the Participant Relations department and now in marketing. She is a graduate from the Music Industry Management program at Ferris State University in Michigan and is a former Percussive Arts Society Intern and a Yamaha Corporation of America, Band and Orchestral Division Intern.

 

Today's guest post is from CJ Longabaugh, Assistant Director of Bands at Blue Valley West High School in Kansas. CJ was a part of the Collegiate/Young Teacher division of the Music for All Summer Symposium the summer before his very first teaching job! Our many thanks to CJ for sharing some thoughts on his experience and why he recommends others to take part in the Summer Symposium as well! 

CJ LongabaughAccepting my first teaching position was probably one of the scariest moments of my life. I immediately began questioning my ability to understand the logistics of the position, effectively managing parents and administration, and successfully teaching students so they have the most musical experiences in high school band. Reflecting on my first years of teaching at Blue Valley West High School, I can honestly say with complete confidence that attending the MFA Summer Symposium has set me up to be the most successful first year teacher I could be for several reasons. Below are some things that I gained by attending the symposium just months before I began teaching.
 
I connected with students. In June 2011 I drove a school van of high school students to the MFA Summer Symposium. Surrounding myself with our leadership team before band camp allowed me to connect with students on so many levels. I was able to learn their about personalities and strengths while showing them how passionate I am with helping them actualize their potential as musicians and leaders. Before band camp even started, I knew 13 students that trusted me as their teacher, and that helped me build strong relationships with all of my students.
 
I learned from the best. Music for All hires the best band directors in the country to conduct clinics and sessions that cover a wide variety of topics: fundamental techniques, conducting clinics, marching show production and design, instrument-specific pedagogy, round table discussions, one-on-one sessions, the list goes on! These expert teachers give insight to the real world of education in the public schools. I specifically remember sitting down with David McGrath in a “one-on-one” session to discuss teaching the “second” band. David gave me more advice and resources in one hour than I ever received in college. Before stepping into my first real classroom, I was able to pick the brain of an extremely successful band teacher who understands how to effectively teach in the modern day band room. His advice allowed me to enjoy the successes I had in the first years of teaching.
 
I networked. I was fortunate to meet so many young, enthusiastic music teachers from all around the country while at the Summer Symposium. After the symposium ended, several of us became “friended”  through many different types of social media. I am able to keep tabs on other band teachers that are going through the same things I am at Blue Valley West. It’s great to hear about new music, performance opportunities, and teaching methods just from reading the newsfeed. The “band director” friends I follow are my current and future colleagues. I could possibly work with one of these colleagues in the future…or maybe one of them helps me get a new job. Either way, networking allows you to build relationships in the intimate music community.
 
The summer before you begin teaching is the perfect opportunity to set yourself to make the most out of your first year. You are able to connect with your future students, work with the best music educators in the country, and network on a national level with other terrific music educators.
 

 

As CJ explains, the Collegiate/ Young Teacher division is a great way to start your career and set yourself up for success! The best part is that you get to participate in the Director's Track, but at a discounted price! If you want to read more about this incredible value, check out the Collegiate/Young Teacher division page on the Music for All website.

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Are you still debating whether or not you should attend the the Music for All Summer Symposium, presented by Yamaha in June? Here are the top 10 reasons why you should consider it!

10. Awesome Evening Concerts!

Each night after a day full of track intensive work (and fun!), the WHOLE camp comes together for an evening of inspiring music! Whether your favorite is an evening of jazz, virtuosic soloists or some of the world’s best drum corps, there will be at least one night you can’t wait to tell your friends back home about!

9. There’s something for everyone

Whether you are a jazz cat, guard diva, marching band buff, orchestra nut, concert band wiz, or drum guru, there’s a division and a place for you at the Music for All Summer Symposium.

8. Leadership is the theme

At the Music for All Summer Symposium we don’t believe that only drum majors or section leaders benefit from leadership. We believe that EVERY student benefits from leadership training and that’s why it is incorporated in EVERY division of the Summer Symposium. Anyone who is willing to pay attention, respond and get involved has the potential to positively lead others.

7. Learn from the best

Where else would you get to go to be instructed by so many of the top music educators and clinicians from across the country?

6. Create life-long friends

At camp you will be with nearly 1,000 other students from all across the country. You will not only have the opportunity to make friends within your own track, but you will make friends with other students in your dorm, your swags, and faculty! These are relationships that can last you a lifetime; just think of the friend requests you will have when you get home!

5. Take music & performance skills to the next level

This IS the Music for All Summer Symposium, so first and foremost you will be getting top-notch performance instruction from our outstanding faculty!

4. Get energized for next school year

There is no doubt about it that you will take things that you learn at Music for All Summer Symposium back to your own band, orchestra or guard program back home, not only music or performance skills, but attitude, energy, and a new outlook. Imagine how much stronger of a performer and leader you’ll be and how it could positively impact your school ensemble! 

3. Get the away from home “college experience”

You’re probably already thinking leaving home to go to college and into the broader world in the next 1-4 years. Heading away from home can be pretty nerve wrecking. Going to a week long summer camp on a college campus is a great way of getting the experience of being away from home, navigating around a campus and having a roommate! It’s a week of learning about yourself in a new environment.

2. It’s more fun than a summer job!

This one is pretty self-explanatory.  What would you rather do? Come to camp, make music and hang out with awesome people or go to work everyday? (p.s. you have the rest of your life to work, spend this summer at camp!) Plus, we know that a large percentage of Fortune 500 CEOs participated in their school music programs, so think of it as an investment in your future! 

1. Surrounded by students from across the country who are different – but also JUST LIKE YOU!

At school you probably are in a band with anywhere from 50-250 students (give or take) who have similar interests as you, and maybe half who are as PASSIONATE about music making as you are. Can you imagine being in one place, where the focus is music making and you are surrounded by nearly 1,000 people who are just as passionate as you are about band, orchestra or guard? Well, you can stop dreaming because that place exists, and it’s in Muncie, Indiana at Ball State University June 24-29.

  

So what are you waiting for? If these reasons didn't convince you that the Symposium is the right place for you, check out our videos on YouTube, Student Testimonials, and the Symposium coverage from last year! 

Are you a student or director who has been to Symposium in the past? Comment and give us your top reasons for why someone should come to the Music for All Summer Symposium this year!

 

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Past Summer Symposium Faculty

2012 Summer Symposium faculty listed in alphabetical order.
* = Division head

Jeremy Allen (Indiana University)

Joe Allison (Eastern Kentucky University)

Corey Alvaro (Carolina Crown)

Robbie Arnold (Adair County H.S., Beechwood H.S., Lafayette H.S. and Lexis WG)

Tom Aungst (Blue Stars) Vic Firth

Scott Belck (University of Cincinnati) Yamaha

Gene Berger (Ball State University)

Greg Bimm (Marion Catholic H.S.)

Mike Bolla (Center Grove M.S.)

Thomas Bough (Northern Illinois University)

Bob Buckner (Former Director of Bands at Western Carolina University)

Mark Buselli (Ball State University) *

Tom Caneva (Ball State University) *

Lee Carlson

Robert Carnochan (The University of Texas at Austin)

Christopher Cansler (Guyer H.S.)

Shannon Clark (Lafayette H.S. and Lexis WG)

Elizabeth Crawford (Ball State University)

Frank Crockett

Aryn Day-Sweeney (Ball State University)

Frank DiLallo

Amanda Drinkwater (Marcus H.S.)

Doug Droste (Oklahoma State University)

John Ellis (Crane School of Music)

Patrick Erwin (Hillgrove H.S.)

Chris Ferrell (Hillgrove H.S.)

Glenn Fugett (Westlake H.S.)

Luke Gillespie (Indiana University)

Elias Goldstein (Ball State University)

Michael Gray

Ron Hardin (Carolina Crown)

Ben Harloff (Carolina Crown)

Matt Harloff (Carolina Crown)

Susie Harloff (BOA Honor Band in the 2005 and 2009 Tournament of Roses Parade)

Lauren Heller (University of Cincinnati)

John Howell

Nathan Jennings (Pride of Cincinnati, Paramount WG and Lassiter H.S.)

Chris Kaflik (Blue Stars)

Sammy Kestenholtz Yamaha and Remo

Fran Kick (Kick it in!) *

Daniel Kirk (Blue Valley West H.S.)

Michael Klesch (Carolina Crown)

Chris Kreke (Carmel H.S.)

Scott Lang (Leadership Trainer)

Tim Lautzenheiser (Music for All Educational Advisor)

Jay Logan (Milford H.S.)

Norm Logan

Leon May (Carolina Crown)

Beth MacDonald (Center Grove H.S. and Avon H.S.)

Andrew Markworth (Carolina Crown) Vic Firth

David McGrath (Kennesaw Mountain H.S.)

Michael McIntosh (Marian University) *,  Yamaha

Erwin Mueller (Ball State University)

Joseph Munoz (Clear Lake H.S.)

Pete Opie (Ball State University)

Jeanne Parks (Drum Major Academy)

John Phillips

Tom Pompei (Centerville City Schools)

Frederick Omega Pye (University of Massachusetts)

Larry Rebillot (University of Cincinnati) *

Ricardo Robinson (Braden River H.S., Tampa Bay Thunder Drum & Bugle Corps and University of South Florida)

Ed Roush (The Cavaliers)

Jeffrey Rupert (University of Central Florida) Yamaha

Scott Rush (Wando H.S.)

Serafin Sanchez (Regis University)

Heidi I. Sarver (University of Delaware) *

Matt Savage (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Zach Schlicher (Carolina Crown)

Kevin Sedatole (Michigan State University)

John Seidel (Ball State University)

Derek Smith (Interplay WG)

Robert Smith (Troy University)

James Stephens (Broken Arrow H.S.)

Keith Sweger (Ball State University)

Vincent Thomas (Apex WG and Onyx World WG)

Michael Townsend (Carolina Crown)

David Wandewalker (Harrison H.S.)

Shawn Vondran (Ball State University)

Mihoko Watanabe (Ball State University)

Alfred Watkins (Lassiter H.S.)

Dean Westman (Avon H.S.) *

George Wolfe (Ball State University)

Jeff Young (Carmel H.S.)

Download a 2011 Directors' Scheduleto see examples of sessions and topics.

Come be a part of America's Camp this summer! Music for All is looking for two nurses to be a part of the Summer Symposium medical team. You would need to be in Muncie, Indiana from June 21st through June 30th.

What does a camp nurse do?

• Administer medication

• Ensure safety of the campers

• Asses injuries and make recommendations on course of action

Our head nurse, Erin, is looking for 2 more nurses to round out her team for summer 2013. Erin has been coming back to camp in this role for the last 11 years.

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"The camp medical team consists of nurses – RN or LPN, Paramedics and/or EMTs that are available on campus during the entire camp to ensure the safety and health of the students during their camp experience. The team is available to campers 24 hours a day. It is a week full of fun and developing friendships along with ensuring safety of students. The energy of the staff and students is rejuvenating and something to be experienced as it is nearly indescribable. That is what has kept me coming back to camp for the last 11 years." - Head Nurse Erin

Transportation, a stipend, housing in the on-campus dorms and meals are all provided.

Do you want to be a part of this positively life-changing experience this summer?

Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 800-848-2263 for more details!

Today's guest post is from Nicole Presley, a Music for All Summer Symposium SWAG (if you do not know what a SWAG is, read more here) and former Summer Symposium student division participant. Thank you Nicole for sharing your story with us!

 

It’s funny how even though I’m still a full-time student sitting in class for hours upon hours for thirty weeks of the year, attempting to learn as much as I can, I learn the most during ten days at the end of June. I don’t sit in a classroom for those ten days. I don’t have a textbook to read. Sometimes I can’t even take notes. But I know for a fact that it’s for those ten days at the Music for All Summer Symposium that I learn the most.

 

NicolePhoto1For four out of the past five summers I’ve attended the Summer Symposium; once as a camper and three times as a SWAG. Between the campers, the Music for All staff, the clinicians, and the other SWAGS, I feel as though I’ve had the privilege of meeting some of the most beautiful people that walk this earth.

 

When I’m talking about camp I find myself saying things like, “It’s just the best.” If you’ve been to the Symposium, you know: sometimes it’s hard to put a finger on just what makes it so overwhelmingly great. I’ve come to realize that the people are what make it “the best.” I learn so much more than just music from the people I interact with at camp.

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In December of 2011, I was coming back from a four month long study abroad trip in Spain and once I was back in the States my connecting flight home was cancelled. I would have been stranded in the airport overnight if it hadn’t been for a SWAG who came to save me even though it was a school night and she was already in her pajamas.

 

Last summer at camp I was a little sick and lost my voice almost completely for the majority of the week. Every day there was one camper who, no matter how terrible I sounded or how hard I was to understand, would say, “You’re sounding much better today, Nicole,” with a sympathetic smile on his face.

 

The SWAG Team shouted “Happy Birthday” at me on my birthday, sending me into silent fits of laughter (it’s really hard to laugh when you have no voice!) at seven o’clock in the morning.

 

On the last day of camp last summer, one of the SWAGs who has been SWAGging for so much longer than me, who I admire incredibly, told me how proud he was of me and the person I was becoming.

 

From them I’ve learned that friendship means going far out of your way to help someone in a time of need, no matter how big or how small; that a smile and a little understanding can go a long way; that laughter really is the best medicine; and that being a mentor means letting someone know that they’re doing at least a little bit of the right thing. They’ve taught me that I want to be more like them.

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Sometimes in my head I hear George Parks saying: “Raise your hand as high as you can. Now raise it two inches higher. That’s what wrong with your lives!"

 

When it comes down to it, I think that’s one of the biggest things that I try to take away from the Symposium each year. I hear it said in sessions with clinicians and I see it carried out in the actions of the people around me.

 

Give as much as you can give, and then give more.

 

-Nicole Presley

 

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